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Time to submit nominations for the Iditarod Hall of Fame

They range from the winningest musher in the history of the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race to a Takotna checkpoint volunteer whose homemade pies may be anticipated as much as the finish line in Nome.

The 19 members of the Anchorage Daily News Iditarod Hall of Fame run the spectrum -- from racers, to artists, to longtime checkpoint officials, to authors to veterinarians. Whether they live in Nome, Anchorage, Takotna or Ruby, all have helped make the Iditarod the premier sled dog race in the world.

Every year since the inaugural class was inducted in 1997, a group of journalists, with contributions from racers and race watchers, discuss whether any new members should be added.

To help its deliberations, the committee is seeking nominations from the public. Nominees can be racers of distinction, officials or some of the many volunteers whose efforts help make staging Alaska's Super Bowl possible.

On this page you'll see a list of the current Hall of Fame members.

You can nominate someone for consideration one of several ways:

• Online: Write a note in the comments area below this story.

• By Mail: Iditarod Hall of Fame, Anchorage Daily News sports department, P.O. Box 149001, Anchorage 99514-9001.

• By Fax: 1-907-257-4342.

In addition to the name of your nominee, please include a few paragraphs describing why the nomination belongs in the Hall of Fame. And please include contact information -- a phone number and e-mail address, if you know them -- for the nominee.

Remember, nominees don't have to be racers. Anyone who has significantly contributed to the race is eligible.

Anchorage Daily News Iditarod Hall of Fame

Lance Mackey

Fairbanks • Inducted 2009

Four-time champion, cancer survivor.

Jan and Dick Newton

Takotna • Inducted 2008

Longtime checkpoint volunteers.

Jon Van Zyle

Eagle River • Inducted 2004

Iditarod artist, volunteer.

DeeDee Jonrowe

Willow • Inducted 2003

Crowd-favorite and two-time runner up with 24 consecutive starts.

Leo Rasmussen

Nome • Inducted 2002

Six-term Nome mayor and longtime race booster.

Doug Swingley

Lincoln, Mont. • Inducted 2001

Four-time champion was best Outside musher in race history.

Don Bowers

Willow • Inducted 1999

Author and musher who loved the Iditarod mystique. Died in 2000, a year before his induction.

Jeff King

Denali Park • Inducted 1999

Four-time champion who retired after 2010 race with victories in every major Alaska distance mushing race.

Martin Buser

Big Lake • Inducted 1998

Four-time champion is the race’s speed record holder and a four-time winner of Leonhard Seppala Humanitarian Award.

Susan Butcher

Manley • Inducted 1997

Four-time champion finished in top-10 in 15 of her 17 races; she died in 2006 and remains the top woman musher in race history.

Rick Swenson

Two Rivers • Inducted 1997

Five-time champion is winningest musher in race history. Has started 34 Iditarods, finishing 32.

Emmitt Peters

Ruby • Inducted 1997

In winning as a rookie in 1975, the “Yukon Fox” sliced six days off the race record.

Libby Riddles

Fritz Creek • Inducted 1997

Her brave dash across Norton Sound in a blizzard turned her into the first woman champion.

Joe Redington Sr.

Knik • Inducted 1997

Father of the Iditarod, his vision and perseverance got the race started. Died in 1999 at age 82, just a decade after his final top-10 finish.

Herbie Nayokpuk

Shishmaref • Inducted 1997

Highly respected “Shishmaref Cannonball” was revered across Alaska for his savvy and skill.

Jerry Austin

St. Michael • Inducted 1997

Three-time winner of the Sportsmanship Award, he helped many mushers in trouble along the trail. Died last year.

Bob Sept

Anchorage • Inducted 1997

Former chief veterinarian took over as Iditarod president in 1983 with the race heavily in debt and guided it back to health.

Dick Mackey

Nenana • Inducted 1997

Won the closest Iditarod in history, beating Rick Swenson in a photo finish.

Joe Delia

Skwentna • Inducted 1997

Longtime checker who lived in Skwentna for more than 50 years. His open-door policy contributed to the warmth of the Iditarod .

Photos: Iditarods 28-38
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