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Letters to the editor (4/26/12)

Small gas line equals big mistake

"Build it! We do not care what, just build it!" cry the rich and powerful in this state. When matched with oil, they are formidable. They have puppets in our government, Parnell and the Republican House. Our state has spilled oil money wealth on more boondoggle projects than any other state in the nation.

None of the boondoggles are bigger than the proposed bullet gas line, HB 9. This state- financed line could double or triple our home heating bills. Current Cook Inlet gas exploration looks good for another 45 years of gas for Anchorage. HB 9 creates an agency that is immune to oversight. Each small pipe makes a large pipe less viable and with less chance of getting our full value from North Slope gas.

Should the oil industry not carry any of the costs and risks transporting their product to foreign markets?

-- Rod McCoy

Anchorage

Downtown market makes it easy for vendors to submit applications

I read with dismay the letter from Ben Waschke about his feelings concerning the Anchorage Market and Festival downtown ("Market isn't vendor-friendly," April 23).

I have been a vendor there for years and must point out that the market directors have done more than a yeoman's job in encouraging local vendors to participate, in particular those with handmade and or Alaska made items. There are special locations at the market for these types of items and reduced fees for locally grown produce vendors .

I hate long-winded and difficult to understand applications, yet I've never had any difficulty filling out the market's applications. Personally, I'd encourage Mr. Waschke to participate. I know that I and the market management would love to have him.

If he'd like some assistance in filling out the application, he can give me a call. Seriously, I'm in the book .

-- Scott Robart

Anchorage

Disc golf course was closed without proper consideration

I find the tactics used by Parks and Recreation to curtail Frisbee golf at Westchester Lagoon provocative. This so called public meeting that was held to discuss issues at the course didn't even involve the president of the disc golf association at the time it was held. In fact, since the course was shut down, this is the first I've heard about such a meeting. When a public forum is required to bring about change, all sides have the right to know a case is being made so that their voice may be heard and the powers that be can make an unbiased decision on the issues.

The parties involved in shutting down Westchester had merit to their reasoning. However, the process they used was overwhelmingly one-sided and borderline malicious. Maturity is required in dealing with these real issues and the crusaders of shutting down the course have stooped to the level of the very people they sought to remove.

Anchorage frolfers keep playing; we don't need no stinkin' baskets!

-- Sean M. Wiederholt

Anchorage

Concussion story shed light on major problem

I am writing this letter in regards to the article written by Beth Bragg, titled "Few good days for teen after concussion." This article introduced a topic which I know very little about, but it encouraged me to gain more knowledge.

According to CDC, "1.7 million people sustain a TBI annually." The numbers are shocking because this particular injury can be prevented.

I believe that it is important for the community to be aware of this injury, and I applaud you for acknowledging the coaches clinic at which Lexi Stewart will be a guest speaker.

I believe ASD coaches should be required to practice in safe environments and that this story should be spread within our schools and throughout the community.

I recommend another story on Lexi so the community can follow her progress and learn more about this invisible injury. Till then we can only hope to gain some knowledge from Beth's beautifully written article, and keep an eye out for TBI symptoms.

-- Susan Bick

Anchorage

Government could help curb diabetes

I am writing to inform you about diabetes. My father has been diabetic for the past 15 years and in the past three years has gotten both legs amputated due to diabetes complications. My father has always been a very big, physically fit man standing 6-3 and weighing over 300 pounds.

I really believe this disorder could be prevented if people had more information on the type of foods they are putting in their bodies. Yes, they may be cheaper than some other foods but in the long run your health is what suffers most.

I also feel very strongly that the government should help. Food vouchers could help individuals to purchase fresh fruits, vegetables, organic food, lean meats and fresh juices either for free or at a discount price. Also make available a lifestyle coach to develop and exercise program for each individual person.

-- Andrea M. Jefferson

Anchorage