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VIDEO: Alaska volcano angry

Alaska Dispatch
Mount Pavlof, a volcano on the Alaska Peninsula, erupting on May 17, 2013. The ash plume reached 20,000 feet.
Chris Owens photo
Mount Pavlof, a volcano on the Alaska Peninsula, erupting on May 17, 2013. The ash plume reached 20,000 feet.
Chris Owens photo
Mount Pavlof, a volcano on the Alaska Peninsula, erupting on May 17, 2013. The ash plume reached 20,000 feet.
Chris Owens photo
Eruption of Pavlof Volcano as viewed from Cold Bay, Alaska, 37 miles southwest of the volcano. May 14, 2013
Courtesy Rachel Kremer
Eruption of Pavlof Volcano as viewed from Cold Bay, Alaska, 37 miles southwest of the volcano. May 14, 2013
Courtesy Rachel Kremer
Terra/MODIS satellite image of Pavlof's eruption on the morning of May 14, 2013.
Jeff Schmaltz / NASA / GSFC
Pavlof volcano erupting on Thursday, May 16, 2013.
Courtesy Theo Chesley
Pavlof volcano erupting on Thursday, May 16, 2013.
Courtesy Theo Chesley
Pavlof Volcano, around 10 a.m. on May 16, 2013, as seen from the north side of the mountain, about 35 miles south of Nelson Lagoon.
Courtesy Theo Chesley
Pavlof volcano erupting on Thursday, May 16, 2013.
Courtesy Theo Chesley
Astronauts aboard the International Space Station (ISS) photographed this striking view of Pavlof Volcano on May 18, 2013.
NASA photo
Mount Pavlof, a volcano on the Alaska Peninsula, erupting on May 17, 2013. The ash plume reached 20,000 feet.
Chris Owens photo
Mount Pavlof, a volcano on the Alaska Peninsula, erupting on May 17, 2013. The ash plume reached 20,000 feet.
Chris Owens photo
Mount Pavlof, a volcano on the Alaska Peninsula, erupting on May 17, 2013. The ash plume reached 20,000 feet.
Chris Owens photo
Mount Pavlof, a volcano on the Alaska Peninsula, erupting on May 17, 2013. The ash plume reached 20,000 feet.
Chris Owens photo
Mount Pavlof, a volcano on the Alaska Peninsula, erupting on May 17, 2013. The ash plume reached 20,000 feet.
Chris Owens photo

Nearly a week after Mount Pavlof awoke, the 8,261-foot volcano on the Alaska Peninsula is still spewing ash up to 20,000 feet.

On Friday, Chris Owens, who runs Conundrum Ventures in Anchorage, flew by Pavlof, shooting video and photos of the eruption, including glimpes of the lava. Here are several videos of Pavlof putting on a show.

The action started May 20 with a "low-level eruption of lava," according to the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO).

By late Tuesday night, an ash plume reached 15,000 feet above sea level. The next day the ash cloud extended to 20,000 feet, prompting the National Weather Service to issue a warning to pilots.

Pavlof, located 30 miles northeast of the community of King Cove, is a frequently active volcano that last erupted in 2007.