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Video: NY Times calls attention to ocean trash on Alaska's 'pristine' beaches

The R/V Norseman carries the tons of debris collected during the Gyre expedition. The garbage was transported to the Kenai Peninsula Borough landfill. The Gyre project is a collaboration between the Anchorage Museum and Alaska SeaLife Center to study and explore the global issue of marine debris. On June 12, 2013, scientists and artists with the expedition, spent the day at Hallo Bay collecting debris, watching bears and discussing the issues.
Anne Raup
Ecologist Carl Safina sorts plastic items collected from an Alaska beach.
NY Times video

Anchorage Daily News photo editor Anne Raup participated in and wrote this summer about the Gyre project, a collaboration between the Anchorage Museum and Alaska SeaLife Center exploring the impact of marine debris on a small piece of Alaska's 6,640-mile coastline. In another follow-up report from the project, The New York Times interviews Carl Safina, an ecologist, and artist Mark Dion about their motivations in joining the project. Says Safina: "We went to a place that most people think is remote and very natural,  and this word 'pristine' that you keep hearing. And we went to show that even in a place that is as distant from where most people live, a lot of our plastic garbage winds up there. There isn't any 'away.' We think that we throw things away, but a lot of what we throw away gets back into the rest of the world."



Anchorage