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Military practices emergency landing in Anchorage

Mike Dunham
Shipping containers are unloaded from the US Army ship Monterrey with the cargo ship USNS Mendonca in the background the Port of Anchorage. The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
Shipping containers are unloaded from the US Army ship Monterrey at the Port of Anchorage. The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
Members of Alpha Troop, 1st Battalion, 297th Cavalry (Reconnaissance and Surveillance Squadron) assist the American Red Cross in setting up a temporary shelter in Cordova, Alaska. Alaska Army National Guard members participated in Exercises Alaska Shield and Vigilant Guard-Alaska 2014, which simulated an earthquake and subsequent tsunami and tested emergency response efforts and preparedness around the state. The exercise also marks the 50th anniversary of the 1964 earthquake.
Sgt. Sara A. Marchus
Members of Alpha Troop, 1st Battalion, 297th Cavalry (Reconnaissance and Surveillance Squadron) assist the community of Cordova during the Exercises Alaska Shield and Vigilant Guard Ð Alaska 2014 in setting up a general point of distribution for fresh water. The purpose of the exercise was to test emergency response services in place around the state, to include the Alaska Army National Guard. Alaska National Guard Soldiers transported supplies, gathered fresh water and distributed it to community members.
Sgt. Sara A. Marchus
Medical staff members of SamaritanÕs Purse field hospital and first responders load a simulated earthquake victim onto a helicopter to be medically evacuated at the Alaska State Fairgrounds during Exercise Alaska Shield and Vigilant Guard-Alaska 2014 on Saturday, March 29, 2014 in Palmer. The Alaska Medical Station and the field hospital worked hand-in-hand to evaluate and treat patients affected by the earthquake scenario. VG-AK14 is a regional, tactically focused exercise and will have multiple interagency field-training exercises that are focused on the response and recovery from a major earthquake and tsunami.
Staff Sgt. Megan Leuck
Sgt. Michael Luper and Staff Sgt. Garrett Kirby, members of Alpha Troop, 1st Battalion, 297th Cavalry (Reconnaissance and Surveillance Squadron) assist the community of Cordova during Exercises Alaska Shield and Vigilant Guard-Alaska 2014. A general point of distribution was set up for the locals to collect fresh water and safety information. The overall exercise simulated an earthquake and tsunami disaster and was meant to test emergency response operations and preparedness around the state of Alaska.
Sgt. Sara A. Marchus
Members of the Alaska Army National Guard's Alpha Troop, 1st Battalion, 297th Cavalry (Reconnaissance and Surveillance Squadron) respond to rioting in Cordova during Exercises Alaska Shield and Vigilant Guard-Alaska 2014. The Soldiers patrolled the streets keeping the community orderly and safe. The exercise simulated an earthquake and subsequent tsunamis and tested emergency response efforts and preparedness around the state. The exercise also marks the 50th anniversary of the 1964 earthquake.
Sgt. Sara A. Marchus
Cordovan Dick Groff provides instructions to 2nd Lt. Thomas Howard during Exercises Alaska Shield and Vigilant Guard-Alaska 2014 in Cordova, Alaska. This statewide exercise simulated an earthquake and subsequent tsunamis. The purpose of the exercise was to test the emergency response services in place around the state.
Sgt. Sara A. Marchus
Staff Sgt. Garrett Kirby of Alpha Troop, 1st Battalion, 297th Cavalry (Reconnaissance and Surveillance Squadron) visits with a local Cordova resident at a general point of distribution during Exercises Alaska Shield and Vigilant Guard 2014. Here citizens were supplied with fresh water and safety information. Alaska National Guard members aided the Cordova community in the statewide combined exercise which simulated an earthquake and subsequent tsunami and was meant to test emergency response operations and preparedness.
Sgt. Sara A. Marchus
Staff Sgt. Ned Tri, right, Alaska Medical Station clinical noncommissioned officer-in-charge, explains to Maj. Ariunaa Chadraabal, left, and Col. Ulambayay Nyamkhuu, center, representatives from Mongolia, the contents of a medical bag used at the AMS during Exercises Alaska Shield and Vigilant Guard-Alaska 2014, March 28. This is a regional, tactically focused exercise and will have multiple interagency field-training exercises that are focused on the response and recovery from a major earthquake and tsunami.
Staff Sgt. Megan Leuck
Sgt. Wilfred Almeida, right, of the 207th Engineer Support Platoon, explains to Maj. Ariunaa Chadraabal, center, and Col. Ulambayay Nyamkhuu, left, representatives from Mongolia, the features of using a mobile application to assess damage during Exercises Alaska Shield and Vigilant Guard-Alaska 2014, March 28. This is a regional, tactically focused exercise and will have multiple interagency field-training exercises that are focused on the response and recovery from a major earthquake and tsunami.
Staff Sgt. Megan Leuck
A medical staff member of SamaritanÕs Purse field hospital evaluates a simulated earthquake victim at the Alaska State Fairgrounds during Exercises Alaska Shield and Vigilant Guard-Alaska 2014 on Saturday, March 29, 2014 in Palmer. The Alaska Medical Station and the field hospital worked hand-in-hand to evaluate and treat patients affected by the earthquake scenario. VG-AK14 is a regional, tactically focused exercise and will have multiple interagency field-training exercises that are focused on the response and recovery from a major earthquake and tsunami.
Staff Sgt. Megan Leuck
Spc. Chantal Ledue of the Alaska National Guard Medical Detachment escorts a distressed patient at the Alaska Medical Station at the Alaska State Fairgrounds during Exercises Alaska Shield and Vigilant Guard-Alaska 2014 on Saturday, March 29, 2014 in Palmer. The Alaska Medical Station and the field hospital worked hand-in-hand to evaluate and treat patients affected by the earthquake scenario. VG-AK14 is a regional, tactically focused exercise and will have multiple interagency field-training exercises that are focused on the response and recovery from a major earthquake and tsunami.
Sgt. Adam Kohl
A soldier with the 297th Military Police Company, Alaska Army National Guard, mans a security checkpoint in front of Herman Hutchens Elementary School as part of a mass casualty exercise during Vigilant Guard Ð Alaska 2014 on Saturday, March 29, 2014 in Valdez. This is a statewide exercise involving national, state and local agencies designed to test the response and coordination of different agencies in a disaster scenario modeled after the 1964 earthquake and subsequent tsunami that ravaged Alaska.
Capt. Brian Faltinson
A member of the 297th Military Police Company, Alaska Army National Guard, inspects the ID card of a man passing through a security checkpoint at the Providence Valdez Medical Center during Exercises Alaska Shield and Vigilant Guard Ð Alaska 2014 on Saturday, March 29, 2014. This is a statewide exercise involving national, state and local agencies designed to test the response and coordination of different agencies in a disaster scenario modeled after the 1964 earthquake and subsequent tsunami that ravaged Alaska. U.S. Army National Guard photo by Capt. Brian Faltinson
Capt. Brian Faltinson
Airmen with the 128th Air Control Squadron, Wisconsin Air National Guard, monitor communications support provided by a Joint Incident Site Communications Capability (JISCC) located at the Valdez National Guard Armory during Exercises Alaska Shield and Vigilant Guard Ð Alaska 2014 on Saturday, March 29, 2014. VG-AK14 is a statewide exercise involving national, state and local agencies designed to test the response and coordination of different agencies in a disaster scenario modeled after the 1964 earthquake and subsequent tsunami that ravaged Alaska.
Capt. Brian Faltinson
Maj. Jeannie Western, 128th Air Control Squadron, Wisconsin Air National Guard, discusses operations with Command Sgt. Maj. Jeremy Miller with the 1-297th Reconnaissance & Surveillance Squadron, Alaska Army National Guard, in the Valdez Emergency Operations Center during Exercises Alaska Shield and Vigilant Guard Ð Alaska 2014 on Saturday, March 29, 2014. VG-AK14 is a statewide exercise involving national, state and local agencies designed to test the response and coordination of different agencies in a disaster scenario modeled after the 1964 earthquake and subsequent tsunami that ravaged Alaska.
Capt. Brian Faltinson
Shipping containers are unloaded from the US Army ship Monterrey with the cargo ship USNS Mendonca in the background the Port of Anchorage. The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
Shipping containers are unloaded from the US Army ship Monterrey at the Port of Anchorage. The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
Members of Alpha Troop, 1st Battalion, 297th Cavalry (Reconnaissance and Surveillance Squadron) assist the American Red Cross in setting up a temporary shelter in Cordova, Alaska. Alaska Army National Guard members participated in Exercises Alaska Shield and Vigilant Guard-Alaska 2014, which simulated an earthquake and subsequent tsunami and tested emergency response efforts and preparedness around the state. The exercise also marks the 50th anniversary of the 1964 earthquake.
Sgt. Sara A. Marchus
Members of Alpha Troop, 1st Battalion, 297th Cavalry (Reconnaissance and Surveillance Squadron) assist the community of Cordova during the Exercises Alaska Shield and Vigilant Guard Ð Alaska 2014 in setting up a general point of distribution for fresh water. The purpose of the exercise was to test emergency response services in place around the state, to include the Alaska Army National Guard. Alaska National Guard Soldiers transported supplies, gathered fresh water and distributed it to community members.
Sgt. Sara A. Marchus
Medical staff members of SamaritanÕs Purse field hospital and first responders load a simulated earthquake victim onto a helicopter to be medically evacuated at the Alaska State Fairgrounds during Exercise Alaska Shield and Vigilant Guard-Alaska 2014 on Saturday, March 29, 2014 in Palmer. The Alaska Medical Station and the field hospital worked hand-in-hand to evaluate and treat patients affected by the earthquake scenario. VG-AK14 is a regional, tactically focused exercise and will have multiple interagency field-training exercises that are focused on the response and recovery from a major earthquake and tsunami.
Staff Sgt. Megan Leuck
Sgt. Michael Luper and Staff Sgt. Garrett Kirby, members of Alpha Troop, 1st Battalion, 297th Cavalry (Reconnaissance and Surveillance Squadron) assist the community of Cordova during Exercises Alaska Shield and Vigilant Guard-Alaska 2014. A general point of distribution was set up for the locals to collect fresh water and safety information. The overall exercise simulated an earthquake and tsunami disaster and was meant to test emergency response operations and preparedness around the state of Alaska.
Sgt. Sara A. Marchus
Members of the Alaska Army National Guard's Alpha Troop, 1st Battalion, 297th Cavalry (Reconnaissance and Surveillance Squadron) respond to rioting in Cordova during Exercises Alaska Shield and Vigilant Guard-Alaska 2014. The Soldiers patrolled the streets keeping the community orderly and safe. The exercise simulated an earthquake and subsequent tsunamis and tested emergency response efforts and preparedness around the state. The exercise also marks the 50th anniversary of the 1964 earthquake.
Sgt. Sara A. Marchus
Cordovan Dick Groff provides instructions to 2nd Lt. Thomas Howard during Exercises Alaska Shield and Vigilant Guard-Alaska 2014 in Cordova, Alaska. This statewide exercise simulated an earthquake and subsequent tsunamis. The purpose of the exercise was to test the emergency response services in place around the state.
Sgt. Sara A. Marchus
Staff Sgt. Garrett Kirby of Alpha Troop, 1st Battalion, 297th Cavalry (Reconnaissance and Surveillance Squadron) visits with a local Cordova resident at a general point of distribution during Exercises Alaska Shield and Vigilant Guard 2014. Here citizens were supplied with fresh water and safety information. Alaska National Guard members aided the Cordova community in the statewide combined exercise which simulated an earthquake and subsequent tsunami and was meant to test emergency response operations and preparedness.
Sgt. Sara A. Marchus
Staff Sgt. Ned Tri, right, Alaska Medical Station clinical noncommissioned officer-in-charge, explains to Maj. Ariunaa Chadraabal, left, and Col. Ulambayay Nyamkhuu, center, representatives from Mongolia, the contents of a medical bag used at the AMS during Exercises Alaska Shield and Vigilant Guard-Alaska 2014, March 28. This is a regional, tactically focused exercise and will have multiple interagency field-training exercises that are focused on the response and recovery from a major earthquake and tsunami.
Staff Sgt. Megan Leuck
Sgt. Wilfred Almeida, right, of the 207th Engineer Support Platoon, explains to Maj. Ariunaa Chadraabal, center, and Col. Ulambayay Nyamkhuu, left, representatives from Mongolia, the features of using a mobile application to assess damage during Exercises Alaska Shield and Vigilant Guard-Alaska 2014, March 28. This is a regional, tactically focused exercise and will have multiple interagency field-training exercises that are focused on the response and recovery from a major earthquake and tsunami.
Staff Sgt. Megan Leuck
A medical staff member of SamaritanÕs Purse field hospital evaluates a simulated earthquake victim at the Alaska State Fairgrounds during Exercises Alaska Shield and Vigilant Guard-Alaska 2014 on Saturday, March 29, 2014 in Palmer. The Alaska Medical Station and the field hospital worked hand-in-hand to evaluate and treat patients affected by the earthquake scenario. VG-AK14 is a regional, tactically focused exercise and will have multiple interagency field-training exercises that are focused on the response and recovery from a major earthquake and tsunami.
Staff Sgt. Megan Leuck
Spc. Chantal Ledue of the Alaska National Guard Medical Detachment escorts a distressed patient at the Alaska Medical Station at the Alaska State Fairgrounds during Exercises Alaska Shield and Vigilant Guard-Alaska 2014 on Saturday, March 29, 2014 in Palmer. The Alaska Medical Station and the field hospital worked hand-in-hand to evaluate and treat patients affected by the earthquake scenario. VG-AK14 is a regional, tactically focused exercise and will have multiple interagency field-training exercises that are focused on the response and recovery from a major earthquake and tsunami.
Sgt. Adam Kohl
A soldier with the 297th Military Police Company, Alaska Army National Guard, mans a security checkpoint in front of Herman Hutchens Elementary School as part of a mass casualty exercise during Vigilant Guard Ð Alaska 2014 on Saturday, March 29, 2014 in Valdez. This is a statewide exercise involving national, state and local agencies designed to test the response and coordination of different agencies in a disaster scenario modeled after the 1964 earthquake and subsequent tsunami that ravaged Alaska.
Capt. Brian Faltinson
A member of the 297th Military Police Company, Alaska Army National Guard, inspects the ID card of a man passing through a security checkpoint at the Providence Valdez Medical Center during Exercises Alaska Shield and Vigilant Guard Ð Alaska 2014 on Saturday, March 29, 2014. This is a statewide exercise involving national, state and local agencies designed to test the response and coordination of different agencies in a disaster scenario modeled after the 1964 earthquake and subsequent tsunami that ravaged Alaska. U.S. Army National Guard photo by Capt. Brian Faltinson
Capt. Brian Faltinson
Airmen with the 128th Air Control Squadron, Wisconsin Air National Guard, monitor communications support provided by a Joint Incident Site Communications Capability (JISCC) located at the Valdez National Guard Armory during Exercises Alaska Shield and Vigilant Guard Ð Alaska 2014 on Saturday, March 29, 2014. VG-AK14 is a statewide exercise involving national, state and local agencies designed to test the response and coordination of different agencies in a disaster scenario modeled after the 1964 earthquake and subsequent tsunami that ravaged Alaska.
Capt. Brian Faltinson
Maj. Jeannie Western, 128th Air Control Squadron, Wisconsin Air National Guard, discusses operations with Command Sgt. Maj. Jeremy Miller with the 1-297th Reconnaissance & Surveillance Squadron, Alaska Army National Guard, in the Valdez Emergency Operations Center during Exercises Alaska Shield and Vigilant Guard Ð Alaska 2014 on Saturday, March 29, 2014. VG-AK14 is a statewide exercise involving national, state and local agencies designed to test the response and coordination of different agencies in a disaster scenario modeled after the 1964 earthquake and subsequent tsunami that ravaged Alaska.
Capt. Brian Faltinson
Shipping containers are unloaded from the US Army ship Monterrey with the cargo ship USNS Mendonca in the background the Port of Anchorage. The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
Shipping containers are unloaded from the US Army ship Monterrey at the Port of Anchorage. The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen
The United States Transportation Command and the Joint Task Force-Alaska and the Municipality of Anchorage conducted an exercise of getting supplies into the Port of Anchorage after a major disaster on Thursday, April 3, 2014. Shipping containers were transferred from a container ship anchored in the inlet to landing craft and then transferred to the port. A fuel unloading and distribution network was also set up.
Bob Hallinen

Ninety percent of the consumer goods for 90 percent of Alaska comes off ships at the Port of Anchorage. If a major disaster took out those docks, how could food, medicine and emergency supplies reach the hundreds of thousands who might be at risk?

A flotilla of gray vessels has been positioned in Knik Arm this week to test the military's ability to respond to such a catastrophe. It's part of the statewide Alaska Shield operation, with multi-agency drills taking place across the state and timed to coincide with the 50th anniversary of the 1964 Great Alaska Earthquake.

The "Joint Logistics-Over-The-Shore" operation, or JLOTS for short, is commanded by U.S. Army Col. Randal Nelson. These joint task forces have become regular exercise in the past few years, usually taking place overseas. Previous JLOTS deployments have been held in Japan, Antarctica and South Korea.

At a news conference on Thursday morning, Nelson described how different branches of the military would use the JLOTS model to bring relief to an earthquake-damaged Alaska. The biggest ship in the exercise, the Navy cargo vessel Mendonca, carried containers capable of holding tons of supplies. It even carried tugboats, three of which were hoisted over the side after the fleet arrived in Anchorage.

But the 951-foot ship draws more than 30 feet and has to stay in deeper water well off the shallow, silty bottom near the docks.

"The Army has shallow draft vessels," Nelson said. They bring the material to shore where a variety of methods can be used to offload them -- cranes, ramps, constructing a causeway.

"Even if the docks are down, we can still get to shore," he said.

The Staff Sgt. Robert T. Kuroda was among the vessels tied up at the port. At 275 feet and displacing more than 4,000 tons, it's the Army's biggest ship. But it draws just 12 feet of water.

Most of the seven crafts in the exercise came up from Tacoma, Wash., but the Kuroda arrived from Hawaii. It was a rough crossing said Chief Warrant Officer Robert Nelson. "The trip was scheduled for 10 days. It took 14," he said. Much of the time the vessel was twisting in 25 degree rolls, he said, noting that the crew was very happy to get to the calm waters of Cook Inlet.

Nelson is usually assigned to the Kuroda's sister ship in Baltimore. The 551 people involved with the drill came from five states, said Col. Nelson, to test whether the ideas of the planners would work in practice.

"We had to find out if we could sail in these waters," Col. Nelson said. "Could we handle the silt, the currents, the extreme tides."

During the drill, which was concentrated in daylight hours, the team was able to offload 105 pallets in one day, he said. He and Coast Guard Capt. Paul Mehler, who commands the port, pronounced the operation a success, but noted the work is not over.

"We'll review each step of what happened and make changes where we need to," said Mehler.

For Marines taking part in the exercise, the work in Alaska won't end when the rest of the group sails home. A line of military green earth-moving equipment stood to one side of the dock on Thursday. It will be reloaded and taken to Old Harbor on Kodiak Island where the Marines will put it to work on an airstrip for the village.

Reach Mike Dunham at mdunham@adn.com or 257-4332.


By MIKE DUNHAM
mdunham@adn.com
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