AK Beat: Anchorage man charged with filming while driving

Alaska Dispatch News

Shooting "Alaska scenery" video while driving nets misdemeanor charge: An Anchorage man was cited for recording cellphone video of “Alaska scenery” while driving in the Sheep Mountain area Thursday, according to the Alaska State Troopers. On Thursday, troopers were pulling over a Toyota Tacoma for speeding near mile 113 of the Glenn Highway, close to the turnout for Sheep Mountain Lodge, when an officer “observed the driver holding a cell phone above the steering wheel taking video while driving.” Borromeo was taking a video of “the Alaska scenery,” trooper spokeswoman Megan Peters wrote in an email Sunday. Ceasar Borromeo, 47, of Anchorage, received a misdemeanor citation for “operating a screened device while driving” and was released at the scene.

Hard landing near Healy: An experimental aircraft piloted by a Wasilla man was landing near Healy on Saturday when the landing gear failed, Alaska State Troopers say. Randy G. Tyler, 56, was not injured but the aircraft sustained “disabling damage,” troopers said in a weekend online release. Spokeswoman Megan Peters said Monday that the type of aircraft wasn’t immediately available. The report of a downed aircraft from Federal Aviation Administration air traffic controllers came in just before noon Saturday. A troopers helicopter and an Alaska Wildlife Trooper responded to the airstrip on St. George Creek. Tyler was taken to Fairbanks and was expected to make arrangements to recover the aircraft.

Greenpeace congratulates Inuit whalers: When hunters in Clyde River, Nunavut landed their first bowhead in more than 100 years, Greenpeace was quick to offer public congratulations to the village. Yes, Greenpeace. As Canada’s National Post explains, the environmental group most associated with campaigns against whaling and seal hunting is changing course in the Arctic. “The gesture is all part of Greenpeace’s new strategy to ‘make amends with indigenous peoples’ and make common cause with them to ban Arctic oil drilling,” the National Post reports. But while some Inuit communities may be leery of oil development, “many Inuit remain deeply suspicious of whether the group suddenly has the best interest of ‘indigenous peoples’ in mind,” the Post notes.

Fuel leak prompts Arctic Cat snowmachine recall: Arctic Cat is recalling more than 3,000 model year 2014 and 2015 snowmachines for a fuel line assembly leak which could cause fires, reports Consumer Affairs. The Minnesota-based manufacturer sold the affected sleds at U.S. dealerships beginning in June 2013 and continuing up until earlier this month, according to the report. “Consumers should stop using the recalled snowmobiles immediately and contact an Arctic Cat dealer to schedule a free repair,” Consumer Affairs writes. “Arctic Cat is contacting its customers directly.” Affected snowmachines include XF 7000 and ZR 7000 models from both 2014 and 2015 model years.