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Lava dome in Alaska's Cleveland volcano continues to grow

Alaska Dispatch
The island with a prominent caldera in left (west) of image is Herbert, just northeast of it is Carlisle, and Mount Cleveland lies almost directly east. The western flanks of Tana are visible in the lower right of the image. Photographed on January 1, 2001.
Photo courtesy Image Analysis Laboratory, NASA Johnson Space Center
Mount Cleveland is a 1,730-m (5,676 ft)-high stratovolcano in Alaska's Aleutian chain. Photographed on July 24, 1994.
Photo by M. Harbin/AVO, University of Alaska Fairbanks
A webcam image showing an eruption at Cleveland Volcano on June 19, 2012.
Alaska Volcano Observatory photo
Aerial photograph of the Mt. Cleveland lava and summit crater on August 8, 2011. Mt. Cleveland is on Chuginadak Island in Alaska's Aleutian chain.
Photo by Dave Withrow/NOAA
Annotated NOAA satellite image from 5:02 AM AST on 29 December 2011 showing a drifting ash cloud from a small eruption of Cleveland Volcano.
Photo courtesy AVO/UAF-GI
Satellite radar image from the TerraSAR-X sensor, showing the summit of Cleveland Volcano on February 10, 2012. It shows the presence of a small lava dome within the summit crater.
Image courtesy of AVO/USGS
This GeoEye IKONOS image shows a faint plume issuing from Cleveland Volcano at 2:31 PM on September 14, 2010. Red in this image highlights areas of vegetation detected by the near-infrared channel.
Photo courtesy Alaska Volcano Observatory/GeoEye
A small volcanic plume rose above remote Mount Cleveland on June 1, 2010. This false-color image was acquired by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) aboard NASA’s Terra satellite.
Image by NASA Earth Observatory
Aerial photograph of the Mt. Cleveland lava and summit crater on August 8, 2011. Mt. Cleveland is on Chuginadak Island in Alaska's Aleutian chain.
Photo by Kym Yano/NOAA
Aerial photograph of the Mt. Cleveland lava and summit crater on August 8, 2011. Mt. Cleveland is on Chuginadak Island in Alaska's Aleutian chain.
Photo by Dave Withrow/NOAA
Worldview satellite image collected on August 9, 2011 of the summit crater of Cleveland Volcano. The irregularly shaped dark object in the center of the image is the newly erupted lava dome. It is surrounded by brightly colored mineral deposits produced by volcanic gas emissions. A thin steam cloud partially obscures the view.
Image courtesy of AVO/USGS, copyright 2011 DigitalGlobe
Ashfall on the Lady Gudny on July 21, 2008.
Photo courtesy Anne Hillman, KIAL/Unalaska Community Broadcasting
2008 aerial photograph of the Island of Four Mountains region, including Mount Cleveland.
Photo by Cyrus Read/ AVO, U.S. Geological Survey
The eruption of Cleveland Volcano on May 23, 2006, is featured in this image photographed by an Expedition 13 crewmember on the International Space Station.
Photo courtesy Image Analysis Laboratory, NASA Johnson Space Center

Alaska's Cleveland volcano keeps grumbling away, with a lava dome continuing to grow, and the alert level remaining at "watch," according to the Alaska Volcano Observatory

A status update on Saturday said that the volcano continued to show activity, but that no elevated temperatures or ash emissions were evident from satellite imagery. Cleveland, about 45 miles from the nearest community of Nikolski, was raised to "watch" status on Jan. 31. At that time, the lava dome was observed at a diameter of about 130 feet.

"The current lava dome is estimated to be 50 meters across and occupies only a small portion of the approximately 200 meter (650 foot) diameter summit crater," the update from the AVO said. "There have been no observations of ash emissions or explosive activity during this current lava eruption. The previous lava dome that formed throughout the fall-winter of 2011 was largely removed by the explosive activity on the 25th and 29th of December, 2011."

That eruption spewed an ash cloud about 15,000 feet into the air. The mountain has no real-time monitoring, allowing for updates only when satellite imagery is available.

Read more, at the Alaska Volcano Observatory.