AD Main Menu

Craig Medred

Seventeen years ago, someone died high on a mountain south of the Alaska port city of Seward at the head of Resurrection Bay.

Alaska State Troopers report, however, they cannot say who they believe it was because of Department of Public Safety policies. Consequently, the man's name may never be known...

Craig Medred

The giant hot dog that’s now a moving landmark on the Susitna Flats west of Anchorage appears to have been the victim of not one, but two pranks.

Left tied beneath the Old Glenn Highway bridge over the Matanuska River a decade ago after being swiped from Little Miller's Ice Cream near Wasilla , it was discovered there by the Miller family...

Craig Medred

The giant foam hot dog in a bun that Luc Mehl and friends stumbled across this spring on the edge of Alaska nowhere left him haunted.

Here his group was on the vast, undeveloped and little-visited Susitna River tidal flats returning from an epic crossing of three Aleutian Range volcanoes -- mounts Iliamna, Redoubt and Spurr -- when this hot dog-like mirage appeared on the horizon.

From a distance, Mehl said, no one could quite believe their eyes, but as they drew closer it became obvious that yes, indeed, there was a 9-foot-long hot dog on a 7-foot-long bun beached like a dead whale on the shore of Cook Inlet...

Craig Medred

DENALI HIGHWAY -- The melancholy flowed down out of Crazy Notch like a river. Magic rode it straight into my heart. Good dogs die, but they never leave you.

Magic was the good dog who lived in the shadow of litter mate Arlo. Arlo was a phenom, a Labrador so black that if you looked hard at him he sometimes almost seemed to disappear. It was like staring into a black hole, an entity there but not there...

Craig Medred

"And how long have you lived here?"

We've all heard the question. It's the essential Alaska query that goes back at least to Gold Rush days and probably longer. At one time, it had more meaning than it does today. Alaska was a wilder place a century ago.

When you set out on the trail at 50 degrees below zero, you best know what you're doing. See Jack London's " To Build a Fire " published in 1908. It was a fictional story about a freezing Cheechako ("newcomer" for you newbies unfamiliar with the local lingo) who foolishly built a fire under the branches of a tree that dropped snow and snuffed it.

He died...

Craig Medred

Battered, bruised, bloody and beaten, at least temporarily, Dr. Gerhard Hafele sat on a rock along a raging creek high in the Alaska Range far from his Austrian home -- far from anything or anyone -- and wondered for a moment if he would ever see his wife and children again.

Minutes earlier, because of a rope too short to control his boat, the middle-aged physician had settled on a near deadly decision to slip into his 14-foot kayak to run a creek raging out of 3,300-foot Shellabarger Pass near the head of West Fork Yentna River...

Craig Medred

One thing Alaskans will know by the time votes from the Aug. 19 election are fully counted is this: Most people were OK with SB 21.

How will we know this? Because whether Ballot Initiative 1 passes or fails, most people won't vote for repeal. Most people simply won't vote.

Former state Rep. Mike Doogan of Anchorage crunched the numbers from past primaries and discovered primary turnouts seldom draw more than 35 percent of registered voters, if that...

Craig Medred

News coverage from nearly two decades ago offers what appears to be the most logical explanation for a partial human jawbone reported found near Seward this week. The discovery had sparked speculation about 65-year-old Michael LeMaitre of Anchorage, who went missing during the July 4, 2012, Mount Marathon Race ...

Craig Medred

The discovery of human remains near Seward has sparked speculation that the body of Michael LeMaitre, possibly the state's most famous missing person, has been found, but that appears unlikely.

A member of the LeMaitre family said Alaska State Troopers told him it did not appear the partial human jawbone found in the mountains above Tonsina Point south of the city belongs to the 65-year-old who disappeared during the Mount Marathon Race on July 4, 2012...

Craig Medred

The inevitable has happened in the 32-year-old Alaska Mountain Wilderness Classic , and 44-year-old Rob Kehrer is dead.

A 10-year veteran of what some consider the toughest wilderness challenge in the world, Kehrer died in the Tana River of Wrangell St. Elias National Park and Preserve on Saturday after apparently launching his packraft a little too soon at the end of the lower river canyon...

Craig Medred

Pages