AD Main Menu

Mike Campbell

Daylight is fleeting. Chilly air demands layer upon layer of insulation. Salt-water spray on a bare face can feel like death by a thousand cuts.

Is this the right time to go fishing? For a handful of anglers with easy access to Kachemak or Resurrection bay, the answer is clear: You bet...

Mike Campbell

For the first time in two decades of adventure filmmaking, the lead segment of Teton Gravity Research’s annual film features a woman....

Mike Campbell

Already the richest middle-distance sled dog race in the world, the Kuskokwim 300 is vying for a new description: affordable.

The race committee staging the series of sled-dog races out of Bethel announced last week that it’s raising the purse of the featured 300-mile race to $120,000 -- a $10,000 hike. At the same time, the shorter Bogus Creek 150 and Akiak Dash races will see their purses grow to $30,000 and $12,500 respectively. The purse comes from Bethel gaming operations, including pull tabs, and sponsorships...

Mike Campbell

It’s mid-October and before long Alaskans in Southcentral will be basking in fewer than 10 hours of daylight. Frost has arrived, but there’s no snow at sea level nor ice on the lakes.

For residents who enjoy the outdoors, this can be a tough time of year. Going to ski swaps and expos like Oxygen and Octane can whet the appetite for Alaska’s longest season. But what if you need to get outdoors today, not next month? We’re here for you with 10 ideas to ensure you get outdoors during the 10th month of the year – some of which carry over into November...

Mike Campbell

Seward may be on the brink of seizing some soggy notoriety as the Alaska locale that endured the wettest day in state history.

For the past 32 years, that distinction has belonged to Angoon, a town of 450 on Admiralty Island in Southeast Alaska, which, according to National Weather Service records, received 15.2 inches of rain in 24 hours on Oct. 12, 1982. That’s nearly as much precipitation as the 16.6 inches that Anchorage gets in a typical year, including snowfall...

Mike Campbell

A surge of silver salmon streaming back to the Nick Dudiak Fishing Lagoon and nearby waters along the Homer Spit has allowed the Alaska Department of Fish and Game to permit snagging beginning Friday.

The limit is six silvers, or coho, per day -- double the normal limit of three fish in most Southcentral Alaska waters.

Not since 2008 has snagging been allowed in the lagoon.

“It’s just exploded with fish,” said Jim Lavrakas, executive director of the Homer Chamber of Commerce . “I’ve never seen it like this before.”...

Mike Campbell

Consider We Alaskans magazine an old friend who’s been out touch for a few years – back now to bend your ear with more tales of life in the 49th state.

The Sunday magazine was removed from the Daily News 14 years ago after a 20-year run as an integral feature of paper’s package of weekend sections. It returns this week as one of several upgrades to the paper, following its purchase by Alice Rogoff, owner of Alaska Dispatch News. Back to the future?...

Mike Campbell
Booming Kasilof red run allows biologists to ease rules

Catch more Kasilof River red salmon, whether in nets or using rods and reels. That was the message from the Alaska Department of Fish and Game on Thursda,y when biologists expanded the area open to personal use dipnetting and doubled the sport fishery bag limit to six per day, 12 in possession.

The move comes because the Kasilof has nearly reached its minimum escapement goal with thousands of red salmon a day expected to enter the river through the first week of August. About 156,000 red salmon already have been counted past the Kasilof sonar...

Mike Campbell

Eighty-nine-year-old angler Charles Conides of Anchorage has fished for red salmon in the Russian River since 1961. He estimates that back in the day, even at the height of the first of two red salmon runs to the Kenai Peninsula stream, only 100 people fished the mouth.

Progress changed that.

"They put that parking lot in there and now it's like Times Square," Conides said.

Now, Conides fishes shoulder-to-shoulder with other anglers in a riverside mob. But despite his age and the crowds, Conides is still bringing home plenty of tasty salmon fillets. Last month, his caught his limit of six fish in just four hours.

"It was very good," Conides said. "It always has been. I've always liked the area."...

Mike Campbell

Eighty-nine-year-old angler Charles Conides of Anchorage has fished for red salmon in the Russian River since 1961. He estimates that back in the day, even at the height of the first of two red salmon runs to the Kenai Peninsula stream, only 100 people fished the mouth.

Progress changed that.

"They put that parking lot in there and now it's like Times Square," Conides said.

Now, Conides fishes shoulder-to-shoulder with other anglers in a riverside mob. But despite his age and the crowds, Conides is still bringing home plenty of tasty salmon fillets. Last month, his caught his limit of six fish in just four hours.

"It was very good," Conides said. "It always has been. I've always liked the area."...

Mike Campbell

Pages