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Mike Campbell

When it comes to catching hefty king salmon, Anchorage angler Kirby Shurtz doesn't let a little adversity stand in his way.

Shurtz's truck -- with fishing gear inside -- was stolen last week, he said. But the Bait Shack on Ship Creek loaned the longtime Ship Creek Slam'n Salm'n Derby angler a 10-weight fly rod. A friend donated a reel, and on Thursday evening, Shurtz was on the creek, casting at one of his usual haunts, near the E Street bridge...

Mike Campbell

The only king salmon in the Ship Creek area adorned with a $1,000 tag was landed Tuesday by angler Curtis Silook in the popular urban Slam’n Salm’n Derby .

Silook caught the fish at 12:13 p.m., according to derby official Angelique Miller. His 36-inch-long king salmon weighed 16.8 pounds.

Before the derby began on Friday morning, volunteers netted and tagged 20 king salmon at the mouth of Ship Creek. Eighteen got $100 tags. One got a $500 tag. Only Silook’s fish had a $1,000 tag. It’s the first time in the three years that the Anchorage firm Microcom has sponsored the derby that a $1,000 tagged fish has been caught...

Mike Campbell

The only king salmon in the Ship Creek area adorned with a $1,000 tag was landed Tuesday by angler Curtis Silook in the popular urban Slam'n Salm'n Derby.

Silook caught the fish at 12:13 p.m., according to derby official Angelique Miller. His 36-inch-long king salmon weighed 16.8 pounds.

Before the derby began on Friday morning, volunteers netted and tagged 20 king salmon at the mouth of Ship Creek. Eighteen got $100 tags. One got a $500 tag. Only Silook's fish had a $1,000 tag. It's the first time in the three years that the Anchorage firm Microcom has sponsored the derby that a $1,000 tagged fish has been caught...

Mike Campbell

On a sunny day four years ago, Scott Dickerson of Homer made a decision he'd appreciate more and more in the coming years.

Instead of hauling out his 17 1/2-foot NDK Explorer sea kayak for a paddle in Kachemak Bay, as he often did, Dickerson stepped onto a generic stand-up paddleboard a friend had brought to the waterfront.

"We were on the beach surfing in the waves, and I kept falling over and over," he said. "I thought, 'I want to figure out how to do this.' Before long, I was paddling and ... I thought, 'Oh my gosh, this is really fun.' I haven't been on my sea kayak since."...

Mike Campbell

On a sunny day four years ago, Scott Dickerson of Homer made a decision he'd appreciate more and more in the coming years.

Instead of hauling out his 17½-foot NDK Explorer sea kayak for a paddle in Kachemak Bay, as he often did, Dickerson stepped onto a generic stand-up paddleboard a friend had brought to the waterfront.

"We were on the beach surfing in the waves, and I kept falling over and over," he said. "I thought, 'I want to figure out how to do this.' Before long, I was paddling and ... I thought, 'Oh my gosh, this is really fun.' I haven't been on my sea kayak since."...

Mike Campbell

For 39 years, Southcentral Alaska anglers have been able to bring home two halibut of any size when fishing for one of the tastiest denizens of the deep. Fortunate fishermen were able to pack their freezers with dozens of pounds of filets from a single trip.

That’s changing this year after the International Pacific Halibut Commission imposed what has been described as a one-and-a-half fish limit because one of the two halibut must be 29 inches or less -- a fish of about 8-10 pounds. The change is the result of a reworked catch-sharing plan that allocates more halibut to the commercial sector and away from sport charters. Southcentral anglers fishing from their own boats still have a two-fish-of-any-size limit...

Mike Campbell

For 39 years, Southcentral Alaska anglers have been able to bring home two halibut of any size when fishing for one of the tastiest denizens of the deep. Fortunate fishermen were able to pack their freezers with dozens of pounds of filets from a single trip.

That's changing this year after the International Pacific Halibut Commission imposed what has been described as a one-and-a-half fish limit because one of the two halibut must be 29 inches or less -- a fish of about 8-10 pounds. The change is the result of a reworked catch-sharing plan that allocates more halibut to the commercial sector and away from sport charters. Southcentral anglers fishing from their own boats still have a two-fish-of-any-size limit...

Mike Campbell

Alaska’s women Olympic cross-country skiers were dreaming of medals when they arrived in Sochi about two weeks ago, but they left with top-30 finishes in their final race on Saturday, a sultry day for the 30-kilometer event.

Four-time Olympian Kikkan Randall was 28th in the women’s freestyle marathon race, some 4 minutes 5 seconds behind winner Marit Bjoergen, the Norwegian superstar who became the most highly decorated female winter Olympian ever with her 10th medal, including a half-dozen golds. Norway swept the medals Saturday when temperatures climbed into the 50s, with Therese Johaug taking silver and Kristin Stoermer Steira earning bronze. The three Norwegians pulled away at about the 10-kilometer mark and pushed their lead to more than a minute...

Mike Campbell

On hard-packed ice highways across the backcountry of the Susitna Valley, cyclists in the Susitna 100 and Little Su 50K blitzed the trails of the Alaska courses this weekend in what appears to be record-setting style.

The husband-and-wife duo of Jamie and Amber Stull won the 50-kilometer (31-mile) race. Jamie was first in just 1 hour, 50 minutes, 57 seconds, while Amber Stull chased him across the finish less than 10 minutes later, in 2 hours flat.

In the 100-mile race, Carey Grumelot, 43, of Eagle River, prevailed in 8 hours, 27 minutes on a new, light 907 carbon-frame fatbike, followed by fellow biker Kevin Murphy in 8 hours, 54 minutes...

Mike Campbell

As the sun rose Tuesday morning in eastern Alaska near the Canadian border, 34-year-old Fairbanks musher Brent Sass pulled out of the small village of Eagle, looking to extend his lead in the Yukon Quest International Sled Dog Race.

After resting four hours, Sass marched his 13 dogs back on the trail at 7:55 a.m. Defending champion Allen Moore, who arrived in Eagle two hours behind Sass, was expected to leave later Tuesday morning.

Sass was at the front of a pack of three mushers, including the race's most recent winners -- Tok's Hugh Neff and Allen Moore, of Two Rivers -- that pulled away from the rest of the race's roster...

Mike Campbell

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