Kim Sunée

Whether or not you care about football, the playoffs and big game day are still excellent excuses — if you need one — to gather a large group to cook, eat and drink. When I think “Super Bowl,” though, I don’t think fantasy teams or touchdowns; instead, an array of dishes, including bowls of stew and chili and other goodies, comes dancing into my head. On game day, I like to have some dishes that can be prepped ahead of time and served at room temperature, like vegetable-heavy dips and spreads; a big pot of serve-yourself chili or jambalaya on the stove; some finger foods, like sandwiches and flatbreads. I also love to have something with a kick to it, like a hot skillet of melting queso fundido with chilies and caramelized onions or crisped-up chorizo. And to get things really heated up,...Kim Sunée
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On game day, I like to have some dishes that can be prepped ahead of time and served at room temperature, like vegetable-heavy dips and spreads; a big pot of serve-yourself chili or jambalaya on the stove; some finger foods, like sandwiches and flatbreads. I also love to have something with a kick...
Kim Sunée
There are days when all you really want to eat is something soft and comforting, food that is both satisfying and far from fussy. For some, it’s an overstuffed burrito or chicken pot pie, perhaps a slice of cake thick with frosting. Usually, I prefer my comfort in the form of something savory and well-earned, like a homemade tart: buttery flakes of crust oozing with a rich cheese base and balanced out with bright green herbs and vegetables. And so I turn to quiche — a classic French savory open-faced pie — every few months and sometimes more, depending on what I happen to have on hand. It’s a great way to make use of leftover vegetables and herbs, meat, fish and forgotten pieces of cheese. Delicious warm from the oven, at room temperature or even cold, a slice makes a satisfying and...Kim Sunée
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I was looking forward to a post-party, simple bowl of warm breakfast cereal -- just a bowl and a spoon in front of the fireplace as I watched the skiers zip down the mountain. But this was no ordinary breakfast bowl. Tender quinoa cooked in coconut milk and topped with a compote of wild Alaska...
Kim Sunée
There’s the Christmas roast duck and some odds and ends of winter cheeses left languishing in the refrigerator -- something inspiring or a chore, depending on how you feel about leftovers. Usually, I’m all about revamping the goods, but by this time of year, I’ve been cooking nonstop for over a month straight (out-of-town guests, holiday meals, firemen dinners, school fundraisers, etc.). So, on the rare occasion when I get to eat someone else’s cooking, I am always delighted. I happened to be co-hosting a friend’s milestone birthday in Girdwood this past weekend and indulged in breakfast at Alyeska Resort. Indulging for me means not having to cook the meal for a group. I was looking forward to a post-party, simple bowl of warm breakfast cereal -- just a bowl and a spoon in front of the...Kim Sunée
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I like this as a poke cake — meaning you make small holes in the cake and, while still warm, pour some of the sauce over to soak into the cake for a sticky and moist treat. Save some of the caramel to swirl with crème fraîche or softened vanilla ice cream or yogurt to serve on the side. Serve with...
Kim Sunée
Gooey, sticky and unapologetically sweet are not qualities I generally look for in a dessert; usually I prefer a good, sturdy piece of Stilton and a slice of crisp pear. But this cake, dotted with dates and covered in a warm caramel sauce, changed my mind. It’s also perfect for holidays -- think midday snack, drop-in guests or a treat after a long, hard ski or hike. I first made this years ago, based on the classic British sticky toffee pudding, but have made modifications over the years, including adding some chopped crystallized ginger in the whipped cream topping. I also like a swirl of crème fraîche in the caramel sauce to balance out the richness. Many older recipes call for chopping the dates, which is easier, while more modern versions call for puréeing them, which yields a lighter...Kim Sunée
I’m standing in the kitchen planning December holiday meals while also revamping Thanksgiving leftovers -- one of the moments I look forward to most after the big feast day -- when I hear one of my out-of-town guests moan that she’s going “liquid and no butter.” Water. Tea. And more water is what I assume. But when she mentions Champagne and I raise an eyebrow in question, she replies somewhat defensively, “What? Champagne doesn’t have butter in it.” I realize that it might be time to put away the porcini gravy and oyster stuffing, and set out ingredients to make a cleansing pot of yellow split peas and rice, which actually tastes much better than it sounds. This North Indian-inspired dish, known as kitcheree or kitchari, literally means a “mess or mixture.” Think of this as a very clean...Kim Sunée
With the winter holidays upon us, there’s inevitably a long list of new recipes I want to develop, and usually I have an equally long list of friends willing to be official taste testers. However, I’ve found that Thanksgiving is not the time for experimenting. Enter the ubiquitous potato casseroles, smothered green beans and sage stuffing — dishes that ooze with marshmallow sweetness or condensed ingredients that conjure intense food recollections, both good and bad. But there is no compromising for some, and so I relent and make room for all the wayward dishes. It’s funny, though, how time mellows our memories of those flavors we once thought of as indispensable to a meal like Thanksgiving, foods we are fond of in the moment but wouldn’t dream of touching any other time of the year...Kim Sunée
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Thankfully, some of the feast foods from my childhood -- whiskey wieners; red and green sandwich loaf; a type of fritter called chicken poulet and turkey poulet -- have not been part of my holiday menus since leading the charge and setting my own tables. One standard that everyone seems to feel...
Kim Sunée

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