Kim Sunée

I worked with a brilliant art director, Howard Greenberg, when I was a food editor for TimeInc. Howard was always ready with a witty remark and obscure facts about French New Wave cinema; he was as well-versed in TinTin adventures as he was in contemporary American poetry. And he could sit in my office or on photo shoots and talk for hours about good home-cooked food, particularly his mother Helen’s during Passover and Hanukkah...

Kim Sunée

Ladies’ night, I recently discovered at my friend Cindy’s house in downtown Anchorage, is much different in your 30s and 40s than in your 20s. And though we talked about everything from which one of us actually made it through “Fifty Shades of Grey” (only two) to flying beavers (the Bush planes, that is) and kids' lunches, we soon got around to the main event, sharing food. In this case, food that elicited comments including: “I let it burp and hiss” and “Once the gas was released, I knew it was good!”

A gathering of my female friends doesn’t often include conversation revolving around burping and hissing gas. We weren’t discussing our partners’ digestive systems, but talking about the fermented foods we had each made and brought to share...

Kim Sunée

We’ve all encountered those superfoods that are supposed to be good for us but somehow -- no matter what you do to them -- end up tasting not much better than cardboard or baby food. My early experiments with quinoa, a complete protein, fell into the baby food category -- bland and mushy. In the effort of clean eating, I kept keeping on with the quinoa, thinking that one day I would love it.

About a month ago, my friend Mara cooked dinner for me -- this is a rare treat when I get to be the guest -- and, thanks to her, I now love quinoa. She had sautéed onions and fresh fennel bulb until they were golden and caramelized before adding it to the quinoa, which she had cooked, in a stroke of genius, in her rice cooker...

Kim Sunée

I didn’t grow up with the notion of Taco Tuesday. As children, my sister and I (who grew up eating Cajun and Creole fare) used to look forward to Friday evenings, which was hard-shell taco night. We had no regrets saying a temporary adios to the pots of jambalaya and gumbo. It was Tex-Mex all the way.

We’d throw down to see who could eat the most pickled jalapeños without taking a drink of water and we’d try our best to make sure our tacos mirrored the Old El Paso photo of perfectly sliced black olive and cheddar cheese-topped shells...

Kim Sunée

Is there anything better than a big bowl of chili for winter gatherings, whether it's casual weekend dinners or the many game days that involve other kinds of bowls? I usually make chili with whole boneless chuck roast that I cut into pieces for Texas-style chili, or a vegetarian version chock-full of chickpeas, black beans and a load of fresh vegetables. Here in Alaska, with friends offering up their hunts, I’ve started making this one-pot wonder with a combination of beef and ground moose or caribou...

Kim Sunée
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I usually make chili with whole boneless chuck roast that I cut into pieces for Texas-style chili, or a vegetarian version chock-full of chickpeas, black beans and a load of fresh vegetables....

Kim Sunée

January always seems to be as good a time as any for healthier eating, but it doesn’t mean you have to give up comfort foods, like pasta and sauce; there’s something addictive about the slurp and chew of good noodles, and they are a perfect vessel for all types of flavor combinations.

This time of year, I always kick-start the month with lots of green -- fruit smoothies with the added punch of spinach and cucumber, fresh herbs on top of everything from omelets to sandwiches. And green tea always makes an appearance, but my family seems to prefer it in stealth combinations. Enter Japanese cha soba, made of buckwheat flour and green tea powder; the flavor is slightly nutty and earthy, with a hint of green tea flavor...

Kim Sunée

By the time New Year’s Eve comes rolling in, if you’re like me, you might be over the meatiness of the holidays, where turkey, ham, brisket and prime rib all seem to make appearances throughout these weeks of entertaining and eating.

So, just in time for New Year’s, some friends shared some of their beautiful fish from this summer’s catch. I thought I’d gussy up the fillets a bit with greens and puff pastry for Salmon Wellington, based on a traditional beef Wellington recipe, but without the beef.

It’s an impressive dish and quite easy to make. And who doesn’t love anything wrapped in layers of buttery pastry? You can improvise on the filling. I’ve made this with everything from sautéed mushroom and creamed spinach or sorrel to a bright green pesto...

Kim Sunée
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By the time New Year’s Eve comes rolling in, if you’re like me, you might be over the meatiness of the holidays, where turkey, ham, brisket and prime rib all seem to make appearances throughout these weeks of entertaining and eating...

Kim Sunée

When speaking to chef Reuben Gerber of the Crow’s Nest in downtown Anchorage, I’m always inspired by his enthusiasm for good food. And when it comes to the holidays, his exuberance is tenfold.

“Hanukkah is right around the corner and that means it’s time for latkes!” he told me recently as we talked about traditional holiday foods. “Growing up in a Jewish home, I could hardly wait to enjoy the festive food … I will never forget tugging on Bubbie’s apron for a latke before they ever made it to the table.”...

Kim Sunée

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