AD Main Menu

Lisa Demer

Federal managers have agreed to closely monitor Kuskokwim River salmon runs to ensure enough fish for residents who depend on it for subsistence, but at this point don't plan to take over the river, as they did earlier this summer.

The Federal Subsistence Board at a work session this week considered requests from villages and residents along the Kuskokwim to take over management of the river for the rest of 2014.

Upriver residents trying to fill smokehouses and drying racks were upset when state managers opened three brief commercial fishing periods last month...

Lisa Demer

On the Yukon River, an experimental commercial dipnet fishery was wildly successful this year, landing more than 250,000 chum salmon, providing $1 million in income for village residents and saving thousands of threatened king salmon, says the buyer of the fish.

But on the Kuskokwim River, a dipnet opportunity aimed at subsistence fishermen found few takers and generated more skepticism than success.

On both Western Alaska rivers, the state allowed dipnetting -- with the big round hoops so familiar on the Kenai River -- to give fishermen some opportunity during the summer runs in which chum and king salmon power upriver together...

Lisa Demer

In a meeting that stretched four and a half hours Wednesday, a Kuskokwim River salmon advisory group agreed to set aside proposals to declare “no confidence” in Alaska's subsistence and commercial fishing managers and instead work within the system.

At issue are diminished salmon runs, early-season restrictions and upriver drying racks and smokehouses still lacking a supply of salmon for winter.

The Kuskokwim River Salmon Management Working Group -- a unique organization that includes subsistence fishermen, commercial fishermen, a fish buyer, elders and others -- advises government fish managers...

Lisa Demer

Kuskokwim River villagers say they accepted early summer fishing restrictions that cost them a chance at treasured king salmon in order to boost the struggling run. But they are outraged over state-approved commercial openings over the past week, before upriver villagers have caught enough fish to store for winter.

While the chinook have passed by, commercial driftnet boats were allowed to target chums and silvers, even though villagers are counting on the latter as their replacement food for kings...

Lisa Demer

ALONG KUSKOKUAK SLOUGH -- On a sunny summer day, the quiet peace of a remote fish camp on a slow-moving branch of the Kuskokwim River became a crazy-busy place of heading and gutting, cutting and hanging...

Bob Hallinen,Lisa Demer
Primary Category: 

ALONG KUSKOKUAK SLOUGH -- On a sunny summer day, the quiet peace of a remote fish camp on a slow-moving branch of the Kuskokwim River became a crazy-busy place of heading and gutting, cutting and hanging...

Bob Hallinen,Lisa Demer

ALONG KUSKOKUAK SLOUGH -- On a sunny summer day, the quiet peace of a remote fish camp on a slow-moving branch of the Kuskokwim River became a crazy-busy place of heading and gutting, cutting and hanging.

The salmon were running, and Bethel elders Roy and Ida Alexie, along with daughters, grandkids and extended family, were catching them.

“I’ll take the heart!” 6-year-old Alyssa “Frankie” Wassillie called out as her mom -- one of Ida’s many nieces -- guided an ulu through the crunch of salmon bone and flesh...

Lisa Demer

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Friday said it intends to take extraordinary action to protect Bristol Bay’s world-class salmon runs and unparalleled natural habitat from destruction by the proposed Pebble mine. But the agency is stopping short of blocking the mine outright and instead is proposing caps on how many miles of streams and acres of wetlands could be lost.

The restrictions would prevent the mega-mine proposed by the Pebble Ltd. Partnership, an open pit for copper and gold extraction that EPA says would be nearly as deep as the Grand Canyon. Even a much smaller one wouldn’t be allowed under the proposal. But mine operators could scale back and design a less destructive mine, EPA said...

Lisa Demer

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Friday said it intends to impose strict restrictions on the proposed Pebble mine to protect Bristol Bay’s world-class salmon runs but is stopping short of blocking it outright.

EPA’s work on Pebble already is the subject of a federal lawsuit, a watchdog agency review and much criticism from Republican political leaders and mine operators.

But Dennis McLerran, administrator of EPA’s Seattle-based region 10, told reporters Friday that the action is necessary “to protect the world’s greatest salmon fishery from what would most certainly be one of the largest open pit mine developments ever conceived of.”...

Lisa Demer

State Rep. Chris Tuck, the minority leader of the Alaska House, will pay a fine of more than $14,000 for mismanaging campaign funds and forfeit nearly $6,000 in unspent campaign funds, under an agreement accepted this week by the Alaska Public Offices Commission.

Tuck, an Anchorage Democrat, mixed up his campaign and personal money, inadvertently used his campaign debit card for personal expenditures, and failed to accurately report campaign contributions and expenditures, according to the agreement Tuck signed in June...

Lisa Demer

Pages