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Steve Haycox

As myriad analysts have trumpeted without letup over the last 10 days, with the resounding defeat of politicized moral fundamentalism and supply-side economics in the Democratic election victory, America has entered a new electoral era, one in which social inclusion is the watchword. Voters had no difficulty distinguishing between economic and social issues, and President Obama and a variety of Senate and House members who advocated equal legitimacy for minority and young voters won a stunning victory that will change America's political landscape...

Steve Haycox

Alaska voters are being asked in the general election Tuesday whether to authorize a new state constitutional convention, a decennial vote provided for in the constitution itself. A few other states have a 20-year query. Former Alaska attorney general John Havelock has written a book on the matter, "Let's Do It Right." He argues that a convention is the right way to address a number of areas in which the present document is flawed and fails citizens' needs and rights...

Steve Haycox

The commemoration of Alaska Day, remembrance of the official transfer of Russian America to the United States on Oct. 18, 1867, passes rather quietly these days. Not everyone remembers what it's all about, perhaps not until they find a state office closed for the day...

Steve Haycox

In 1987, the novelist Tom Wolfe published his fantasy "The Bonfire of the Vanities," about a super-rich bond trader whose life and career are ruined by a careless judgment he makes after a chance encounter with a group of young men in the Bronx he perceives as street toughs. When several real incidents of a similar nature occurred in New York City over several months following the novel's release, Wolfe commented that it's no longer possible to write meaningful fiction because today's realities are more fantastic and dangerous than any novelist's story...

Steve Haycox

In what can only be described as a remarkable journalistic event, the highly respected, nominally centrist conservative New York Times columnist David Brooks published last Tuesday a scathing analysis of Mitt Romney's presidential campaign, following the circulation on the Internet of a video from last May in which Romney, meeting with a group of Republican high rollers, asserted that "47 percent of the country are people who are dependent upon government, who believe they are victims, who believe the government has a responsibility to take care of them. . ." and don't pay income taxes...

Steve Haycox

When the Alaska constitutional convention met in Fairbanks in the fall of 1955, Alaska's lone elected delegate to Congress, Bob Bartlett addressed them on the first day. Delegates expecting a fuzzy, warm talk of patriotic platitudes were likely surprised by what they heard. Bartlett did not mince words. He was anxious delegates understand how their work would shape Alaska's future, and he laid out his concerns starkly and boldly. A testament to his vision, his words were prescient and prophetic...

Steve Haycox

For several months Alaskans have been bombarded with concerted, corporate-generated television, radio and print advertising campaigns advocating a roll-back of oil taxes, support for development of the Pebble mineral prospect, and the defeat of an initiative for renewal of the state coastal zone management program.

More recently, corporate money has begun to flow to candidates for election to the state Senate who would break the coalition there that has so far successfully resisted the roll-back of ACES...

Steve Haycox

In what must be considered one of the more remarkable developments of modern American life, the U.S. seems on the high road to demolishing its system of public education. Throughout the late 19th and much of the 20th century, American public schools were the envy of and model for national education programs across the globe. They reached a far greater portion of the population than any other national system, had a comprehensive and flexible curriculum, were gender neutral, and increased the literacy rate far beyond even the most advanced countries, including Britain and Germany whose systems were rooted in an elitist conception of access to education...

Steve Haycox

When Congress authorized creation of the Alaska Territorial Legislature in 1912, it brought to Alaska the final phase of the territorial system that had been implemented in all the other territorial acquisitions of the United States since the beginning of the nation, with just a few exceptions. That process began with the presidential appointment of a governor, judge and minor civil officials, as authorized by Congress, whenever the solons determined the time was right...

Steve Haycox

One hundred years ago next month, President William Taft signed the congressional enactment authorizing the biennial election of a territorial legislature in Alaska. This was the third major element of the territorial system Congress had established for newly acquired lands at the beginning of national government, in the 1780s. This column treats the first element.

That was congressional authorization of presidential appointment of a governor, a judge and marshals, recording clerks and others. Congress took this action in 1884, 17 years after the Alaska purchase. Until that time, law and order were maintained in Alaska first by the U.S. Army, then, briefly, the Customs Office, and finally the U.S. Navy...

Steve Haycox

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