Lynne Curry

Q: I work for a highly profitable company, run by a ruthless man, who operates it like his personal fiefdom. He has sexually harassed me for three months. If I try to sue, I’ll not only lose my job but won’t be employable in Anchorage. I like my job, make a good salary and there aren’t many companies in Anchorage that employ those with my skill set. The ones that could aren’t hiring given the drop in oil prices.

He began with suggestive comments. At first, I thought I read too much into his innuendos as his language is rough. Even after he brushed his hands across my breasts, I still thought I could handle the situation. But one day he grabbed me...

Lynne Curry

Q: Several months ago I got hired into a midlevel position by a large retail chain that’s been plagued by employee theft. I’m the only supervisor who didn’t rise through the ranks and doesn’t have a retail background.

I’ve learned employees I’d never suspect of pilfering merchandise not only steal, but lie with a straight face about how they didn’t take the items we catch them with. In the past, we’ve made it clear we prosecute any employees we suspect, but this hasn’t stopped the amount of theft; nothing has...

Lynne Curry

Q: I’ve had a string of bad bosses, resulting in five job changes in the last three years. I want to settle down with one company and know the secret is finding a decent manager who treats employees well.

I recently interviewed for a job with a company. The manager seemed like an all-right guy but you never know. After the interview, I realized I could search the company’s website for a list of employees and find out from them what it was like to work for the man. So that night I called several employees and asked them fair questions about what working for him was like...

Lynne Curry

Q : A former employee joined my company planning to start his own competing business and worked for me just long enough to pilfer materials I spent the last decade creating. I had a forensic computer specialist assess the former employee’s computer. He documented that this employee saved substantial quantities of information from our server to flash drives and emailed multiple documents to his Hotmail account. He’s now using my materials in his business...

Lynne Curry

Q: My best friends at work and I all share the same “geez, who are they kidding?” reaction to the crap that comes down from above in our company. We get together at least two nights a week, have a beer or two and shoot the breeze or play darts.

I recently decided to go back to school, taking two classes on Monday nights. I told the gang and thought they’d cheer me on. Instead, one guy said, “Way to go, bro,” but everyone else just kept discussing who was going to win the Super Bowl...

Lynne Curry

Q: Our executive director plans to retire within the year. The board of directors has made it clear that they’re considering two of us as ideal successors.

I couldn’t care less about the potential promotion, as the headaches aren’t worth the money. "Lloyd" desperately wants the job, sees me as a threat and has been trying to take me out of the running. I tried to reassure him by saying, “I don’t want the job,” but Lloyd took this as an insult, asking, “What makes you think you’ve even got a shot?”...

Lynne Curry

Q: I supervise a talented, touchy woman. When I give her compliments, she takes them as her due. When I give her suggestions for how she can improve, she argues and sulks.

About six months ago, I got tired of the drama and stopped trying to give her feedback. That worked until last week when it came time for her annual performance review. Even though I gave her an “exceeds expectations” rating in one area and “meets expectations” ratings in the rest, she became extremely upset. She felt she deserved “exceeds expectations” ratings in all but one area.

She apparently stormed into the HR office, claiming I’d unfairly rated her. They called me on the carpet. Although I was able to back up each of my ratings, the fact that my employee sought out HR made me look bad...

Lynne Curry

Q: We have a dirty little secret in our company. Our comptroller is a no-holds-barred bully. Cross him and your work life isn't worth living. His employees and other department heads either knuckle under or leave.

I refuse to let him know he intimidates me. Although he scares me and I’ve thought of quitting, I’ve decided I’m not going to let him run me out of a job I like. He’s not used to others standing up to him, and he’s making my life a living hell.

We have a code of conduct in our company that supposedly addresses this. I met with our director of human resources and laid out the case showing the many ways in which the comptroller violates the code of conduct. She asked, “What do you expect me to do?”...

Lynne Curry

Q: My company recently promoted me. I was initially stunned and then excited. I’ve always been a follower and not a leader, and my manager’s faith in me made me desire to do my very best.

One of my former co-workers thought he should have received the promotion, as he had a master’s degree. When I reached out to him to tell him I thought we’d be a good team, he rebuffed me, saying, “Your promotion’s a joke” and “Hope you don’t ---- things up too bad.” I didn’t tell my manager about this exchange because I didn’t want him to think he’d picked the wrong person to promote...

Lynne Curry

Q: My husband’s company has branch offices in Anchorage and Seattle and a corporate office in Houston. The branch office manager in Anchorage is younger than my husband and has no plans to move on. As a result, there’s been no chance for my husband to move up the ladder.

I begged my husband to look at other job opportunities, but he stubbornly refused. He said he likes his work and the people in his company, both here and in the other offices, and wasn’t willing to change careers or companies.

He just got offered a promotion to be the branch manager in Seattle. He’d be making more money than the Anchorage branch manager. Because it’s with the same company, he’s suddenly willing to move up. He’s excited and expects me to be excited as well.

I’m not...

Lynne Curry

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