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Paul Jenkins

It is easy to shrug off the notion of federal “overreach” -- dismissing it as rhetoric or political mumbo-jumbo -- until you get a peek inside a federal agency hell-bent on getting its way, no matter the law, that uses any and every possible means to tilt the playing field.

The federal Environmental Protection Agency, it turns out, is just such an agency. It is waging a relentless, precedent-setting campaign to preemptively veto development of the Pebble project in the Bristol Bay region -- using junk science, secrecy and authority it does not have -- even before the first development plan sees daylight...

Paul Jenkins

It is unsurprising Bill Walker would rejigger an election with his new union pals and Democrats to finally pocket the keys to the governor’s mansion. The surprise is that he did it willingly -- without a gun to his head.

Who in his right mind, given Alaska’s grim fiscal reality, would want the job? A normal person would dodge it like ringworm. Perhaps Walker should follow the late Gov. Wally Hickel’s lead and have his noggin examined to prove he is not nuts.

What does Walker win? In his own words, “lean times” -- a laughably optimistic assessment...

Paul Jenkins

With dust from recent elections still clouding the air, many political junkies itching for fireworks -- and unwilling to quietly eat their popcorn and await the train wreck that is our new state government -- already are focusing on the 2016 Senate race. It has possibilities.

The big question seems moot: Sen. Lisa Murkowski almost certainly will seek re-election, barring her being squished by a meteor. Already she is rejiggering staff.

With a dozen years seniority and a new job as Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee boss, she is coming into her own. It takes forever for a senator to gain enough seniority and clout to do Alaska any good -- and she is about there. Think Ted Stevens...

Paul Jenkins

Obamacare, it turns out, is just another in a long string of big lies from the political left. A huge, complicated fantasy cloaked in gibberish, it is a whopper so enormous, so monstrous it could transform the United States into something unrecognizable if it is not stopped.

Why lie in creating the law? The left -- surprise! -- says it believes you are too stupid to handle the truth; that Obamacare is designed to fail; that it will cost too much; that it is a massive redistribution of wealth from the young to the old; that it is a first, necessary step to the single-payer, socialized health care system of its dreams.

In fact, it fears you are too smart, so the left does what it must to survive -- it lies...

Paul Jenkins

It must stink to be Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid. Repudiated. Abandoned. Frustrated. One day, he is on top of the world, thumbing his nose at Republicans and the American people. The next? Looking up at the underside of a runaway bus.

Apparently stunned senseless by Tuesday’s Democratic election disaster, Reid appears befuddled.

"The message from voters is clear: they want us to work together," he says. "I look forward to working with Senator McConnell to get things done for the middle class."

He is, of course, dreadfully wrong and Republicans everywhere should take note: They could be just as hopelessly confused -- and soon -- if they muff the opportunity handed them by the American people...

Paul Jenkins

There is something subliminally irksome about the so-called gubernatorial unity ticket of Republican-cum-independent-cum-undeclared Bill Walker and hard-core Democrat Byron Mallott. It is hard to pinpoint, like a mosquito’s high-pitched bzzzzzzz near your ear as you fall asleep. But it is there. A warning.

Yes, there is that thing about the ticket being a poll-driven, hand-picked AFL-CIO Frankenstein, spawned in the desperate political reality that neither Walker nor Mallott had the proverbial snowball’s chance individually to beat Republican Gov. Sean Parnell in the general election...

Paul Jenkins

Attack ads bolstering Mark Begich’s quest to retain his Senate seat are enough to make any self-respecting snake blush. To endure them day-in and day-out without developing spiritual callouses, a person needs, as Hunter S. Thompson once put it, the soul of a lizard.

At least one of the ads -- vicious enough to make even the left gasp -- drew national ridicule and scorn. If you give them much credence you would have to believe Begich’s opponent, former Alaska Attorney General Dan Sullivan, is the devil incarnate, that Alaska women are not very bright, and that they care only about abortion and free birth control. Heaven forbid they would worry about the economy, or jobs or national security issues. Begich apparently would leave all that heavy lifting to the menfolk...

Paul Jenkins

The initiative process in Alaska is a playground for Outside bamboozlers and monied special interests that want, even need, to dodge the give and take -- the vetting, the debate, the political free-for-all of the legislative process to get their way.

Despite the progressive malarkey and populist romanticism of having the people rise up against “The Man,” initiatives are, as the late Washington Post columnist David Broder pointed out, “alien to the spirit of the Constitution.”

Ballot Measure 2, put on the Nov. 4 general election ballot by initiative, is a nifty example...

Paul Jenkins

If the political left is anything, it is prone to bouts of hypocrisy. The public is catching on to the sad reality that a rational person must take anything liberals say - anything - with a grain of salt.

Take, for instance, the left’s obsessive fascination with the industrialist brothers Koch, who early on became a convenient burr under Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid’s saddle. He hand-picked them, targeted them for a cynical disinformation campaign, a bit of political theater that would do ol’ Joe Goebbels proud. If the Kochs did not exist, Reid would have been forced to invent them...

Paul Jenkins

Watching the grinding, soul-shredding contest for the U.S. Senate seat handed Democrat Mark Begich by our friends in the Justice Department, it is easy to see where each side in the fracas -- desperate for new ideas, any ideas, at this late date -- hopes to find a campaign boost.

Begich and Republican Dan Sullivan are turning the run-up to November’s battle for control of the Senate into a "War of Women." Suddenly, there is one woman after another on television touting the candidates, defending their honor, making their points, countering attacks...

Paul Jenkins

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