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Paul Jenkins

As President Barack Obama teleprompted his way through what at first looked like a desperate bid to reconnect with a battered and suspicious middle class, or at least assuage it, his State of the Union delivery made it clear that from Obama's perspective, the problem is -- ta-da -- not enough Obama...

Paul Jenkins

There is a warning implicit in Scott Brown's electrifying special election win over Massachusetts Attorney General Martha Coakley -- a warning for cocky Democrats so certain of victory only a few days ago and Republicans already oblivious to why voters dumped them a few years ago. It is simple, really, even if the left does not get it:

America is angry. Very, very angry.

Despite President Obama's fervent hope for change, we do not want to be socialists, never have. We certainly do not want a nation molded in the image of some inbred, cheese-eating European fiefdom...

Paul Jenkins

A Superior Court judge says the state Department of Natural Resources tap-danced all over ExxonMobil's constitutional rights to procedural due process in a dust-up over development at Point Thomson on the North Slope.

Given the department's unfathomable animus for the industry, especially its favorite bogeyman, oil giant ExxonMobil, it is no surprise. After all, DNR's fear and loathing of the industry is what triggered the comically ill-advised Alaska Gasline Inducement Act that cost us $500 million -- so far...

Paul Jenkins

A reasonable person must wonder why members of the Anchorage Assembly majority are not in a lather to discover whether former Mayor Mark Begich played a shell game with city finances right before they voted in 2008 on $150 million in labor contracts.

A reasonable person also must ask: If there is something amiss in how we do things with the city's finances, would it not be prudent to find out what it is and find a way to fix the problem so that it does not happen again?...

Paul Jenkins

Watching Senate Democrats peddling their votes, themselves and this nation in the name of so-called health care reform most Americans do not want is enough to make a buzzard retch.

The sleaziness is only compounded by their pretending they are doing us a favor; that they are saving us; that they will reduce our staggering deficit. They fail to mention that the law would not go into effect until 2014, but its taxes -- truckloads of them -- crank up immediately...

Paul Jenkins

Good grief, even Chicago Tribune columnist Clarence Page is buying into Sarah Palin's schtick. Clarence Page! It makes my head hurt.

In a column titled, "The Palinpalooza rolls on," the left-of-center Page writes about the former GOP vice presidential nominee's Gridiron Club appearance in Washington, D.C., a few days ago. He was, surprisingly, quite taken with her -- coming away, he says, with new-found fondness and respect. She, after all, got laughs from a tough crowd.

Page is no dummy, but I'm left to wonder whether he has taken leave of his senses in a Palin-generated swoon. It's the kind of thing that only adds to the mystery of what the crowds and pundits Outside see when they look at Sarah Palin; what they hear when they listen to her...

Paul Jenkins

As we work up our nerve to belly-flop into $20 trillion in red ink over the next decade or so, one can only wonder how anybody with any sense could even think about piling on more spending and debt.

That, of course, ignores the fiscal depravity of Senate Democrats, who never saw somebody else's money they did not lust to spend. This past weekend they joined in a frenzy to spawn the Patient Protection and Affordability Act -- government health care -- that will cost Americans $2.5 trillion in its first decade of actual operation (2014-2023) and adds or increases more than a dozen taxes, totaling $485 billion -- including one for abortions...

Paul Jenkins

Alaska state government is bruising, if not breaking, the law by failing to release in a timely fashion Palin administration e-mails and other information sought under the state public records law.

From its first days, Sarah Palin's administration played fast and loose with public records. Some requests for e-mails and documents from her brief tenure have been pending for more than a year. That is outrageous, and Gov. Sean Parnell wants yet more time.

The excuses?...

Paul Jenkins

People ask me: What do you think about Bill Allen and what he did?

What do I think?

It's over -- finally. At least for a while.

Allen, former Veco executive and ersatz newspaper publisher, was imprisoned for three years and fined $750,000 for his role in wide-ranging corruption that cost Alaska its senior U.S. senator.

What do I think?

Three years? I think he is one of the luckiest men alive...

Paul Jenkins

As some in Congress toy with bailing out struggling newspapers and the president says he will be "happy to look at" such legislation, you have to wonder what it would mean if the press no longer were free of the very government it is supposed to watch.

Bureaucrats, police and politicians historically have probed and prodded, looking for ways to influence or control or use the press to their own ends. It certainly is no secret that in the past -- and likely now -- police have posed as reporters and photographers to gather information surreptitiously...

Paul Jenkins

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