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Richard Mauer

The official who oversaw the state Election Division's Yup'ik language program knew that a mangled translation about absentee balloting was running on radio in Bethel and Dillingham in 2009 but told her bosses to just ignore it.

Instead of saying "absentee voting," the notice on KYUK and KDLG said, "to be voting for a long time."

"We will be criticized by the plaintiffs if they catch it, but what the heck, it's a similar word and hope that it goes right over their heads! :-)" Dorie Wassilie, the Election Division's language coordinator in Bethel and a Yup'ik speaker, wrote in Sept. 17, 2009, email to her boss, Shelly Growden.

Growden, who doesn't speak Yup'ik, agreed with Wassilie's judgment. "I too think it should be fine," Growden replied...

Richard Mauer

With trophy heads and pelts lining the walls, Rep. Don Young's Washington office may leave visitors thinking they are in the presence of a master hunter.

And Young himself has done nothing to disabuse anyone of the notion he's a tough wilderness man, once sticking his own hand in an animal trap in a hearing to prove a point, and sometimes telling reporters that he's missed sessions of Congress to stalk wild game.

While Young may be familiar with the bog-slogging and bug-swatting Alaska experience in home-state hunts for moose and caribou, that's not the description of Young's hunting trips contained in the House Ethics report that rebuked him last week...

Richard Mauer

With trophy heads and pelts lining the walls, Rep. Don Young's Washington office may leave visitors thinking they are in the presence of a master hunter.

And Young himself has done nothing to disabuse anyone of the notion he's a tough wilderness man, once sticking his own hand in an animal trap in a hearing to prove a point, and sometimes telling reporters that he's missed sessions of Congress to stalk wild game.

While Young may be familiar with the bog-slogging and bug-swatting Alaska experience in home-state hunts for moose and caribou, that's not the description of Young's hunting trips contained in the House Ethics report that rebuked him last week...

Richard Mauer

After filing as a last-minute Republican primary challenger to Sen. Click Bishop just before the June 2 deadline, former Sen. Mike Miller has withdrawn as a candidate in Bishop's Fairbanks and North Pole district.

Miller said Tuesday he discovered at a long meeting with Bishop that the two shared ideas on resource development and budgetary restraint.

"We didn't talk about that much on social issues," said Miller, who was one of the most conservative members of the Legislature when he served from 1983 to 2000. "There are probably certain votes we might have disagreed on."...

Richard Mauer

After filing as a last-minute Republican primary challenger to Sen. Click Bishop just before the June 2 deadline, former Sen. Mike Miller has withdrawn as a candidate in Bishop's Fairbanks and North Pole district.

Miller said Tuesday he discovered at a long meeting with Bishop that the two shared ideas on resource development and budgetary restraint.

"We didn't talk about that much on social issues," said Miller, who was one of the most conservative members of the Legislature when he served from 1983 to 2000. "There are probably certain votes we might have disagreed on."...

Richard Mauer

The House Ethics Committee said Friday that Rep. Don Young violated Congressional rules by improperly accepting nearly $60,000 in hunting trips, rides on private planes and other gifts and failing to report them on his financial disclosure forms.

The gifts date back to 2001, when Young stayed at the ranch of Bob Malone, the former Alyeska Pipeline Service Co. president and top BP official in the United States, and improperly accepted a private-plane from Malone worth $3,000. They continued through 2013, when Young accepted $138 in lodging and meals from the Associated General Contractors of Texas, according to the House Ethics Committee...

Richard Mauer

The House Ethics Committee said Friday that Rep. Don Young violated Congressional rules by improperly accepting nearly $60,000 in hunting trips, rides on private planes and other gifts and failing to report them on his financial disclosure forms.

The gifts date back to 2001, when Young stayed at the ranch of Bob Malone, the former Alyeska Pipeline Service Co. president and top BP official in the United States, and improperly accepted a private-plane from Malone worth $3,000. They continued through 2013, when Young accepted $138 in lodging and meals from the Associated General Contractors of Texas, according to the House Ethics Committee...

Richard Mauer

The “education session” of 2014 was a bust for the public school advocates who banded together as Great Alaska Schools, and they now are vowing to make this year the “education election” at the ballot box.

“We want to make public education a really big issue for people,” said Becca Bernard, one of the parents involved in Great Alaska Schools. “We care about our kids’ schools, and we care about having strong public schools for all children. We realized after this session that that is not as firmly supported in this state as we would’ve thought.”

After taking off most of May to regroup, some 20 core members of the grassroots organization they call “GAS” spent a full Sunday in retreat last week to decide what, if anything, to do next...

Richard Mauer

The "education session" of 2014 was a bust for the public school advocates who banded together as Great Alaska Schools, and they now are vowing to make this year the "education election" at the ballot box.

"We want to make public education a really big issue for people," said Becca Bernard, one of the parents involved in Great Alaska Schools. "We care about our kids' schools, and we care about having strong public schools for all children. We realized after this session that that is not as firmly supported in this state as we would've thought."

After taking off most of May to regroup, some 20 core members of the grass-roots organization they call "GAS" spent a full Sunday in retreat last week to decide what, if anything, to do next...

Richard Mauer

Two Democratic state senators who led the opposition to Gov. Sean Parnell’s oil tax cuts challenged him Tuesday to prove the cuts will produce more oil by giving the industry five years to beat current production. If they fail to meet that target, the new tax would be rescinded, as proposed in legislation unveiled by the two lawmakers.

At a news conference in Anchorage, Sens. Hollis French and Bill Wielechowski, both of Anchorage, asked Parnell to call the Legislature into special session for the “show me” bill they are having drafted...

Richard Mauer

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