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Americans should not take threats from North Korea seriously

After Sony was hacked (presumably by North Korea) because of its comedy that was about to be released about assassinating Kim Jong Un (their “Great Leader”), movie theaters were apparently threatened and many chose not to show the movie. Consequently Sony canceled its release.

Sony says — commendably, in my view — that it remains committed to releasing the movie but it needs distributors who aren’t cowed by North Korean (or other) threats.

Did theater chains accurately gauge the spirit of Americans that we would stay away in droves from theaters that were showing “The Interview,” even avoiding other movies being shown in the same complex?...

Alaska Dispatch News

After recently reading an Alaska Dispatch News headline with a preposterous claim, “ Manager says increasingly expensive Susitna dam could help salmon ,” (Dec. 18) I must protest with due respect. As a freshwater ecologist who has worked on salmon rivers for 40 years, I want to make it clear: Without question, a dam the size of Susitna-Watana will kill the Susitna as a salmon river...

Jack Stanford, Ph.D.

Alaskans are three times as likely as Americans as a whole to know about ocean acidification and be worried about it, but are hazy on the scientific process that is changing the chemistry of the oceans, according to a newly published study by researchers from the University of Alaska Fairbanks and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration...

Yereth Rosen

FAIRBANKS -- In assembling his cabinet and key support staff, Gov. Bill Walker has chosen a wide variety of independents, Democrats and Republicans, as well as one Olympic champion.

Pat Spurgin Pitney, selected by Walker to be the state budget director, won a gold medal at the Los Angeles Olympics in 1984. She was an 18-year-old college sophomore when she became the first woman to win an Olympic gold medal in air rifle. A year before the Olympics, she won four gold medals at the Pan American Games, and she also was an NCAA champion at Murray State University in Kentucky and an eight-time All-American in both air rifle and the smallbore rifle competition...

Dermot Cole

Attorney General Craig W. Richards is raising antitrust concerns over a proposed sale of the Point MacKenzie liquefied natural gas terminal to a Hilcorp Alaska LLC subsidiary...

Eric Lidji | Petroleum News
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Over nearly four decades, Joe “The Waterman” Shults has crammed art, artifacts and animals of the Arctic into a second-story apartment. That time span pales in comparison to the pieces on display that include tools 150 to 1,800 years old, and mammoth teeth more than 10,000 years old...

Jerzy Shedlock

Unlike other cultural destinations in Barrow, Joe’s Museum does not keep regular hours.

The museum does not have a gift shop. Its proprietor is opposed to selling anything in his collection. Word of mouth brings a few hundred people to the museum each summer, the tourist season between the months of May and September.

Over nearly four decades, Joe “The Waterman” Shults has crammed art, artifacts and animals of the Arctic into a second-story apartment in the northernmost city in the United States, situated above the Arctic Circle. That time span pales in comparison to the pieces on display that include tools 150 to 1,800 years old, and mammoth teeth more than 10,000 years old...

Jerzy Shedlock

HOMER -- I was a fledgling Alaskan and beginning writer when I met Elsa Pedersen in the summer of 1982. A freelance writing assignment sent me to Sterling, where she lived with her husband, Walt, and our paths crossed. Not long after, my husband and I visited at their home by Safin Lake...

Ann Dixon

HOMER -- It was nearly 10 a.m. before the clouds pinked over the mountains and the woods’ creatures began to rouse. The scoldings of red squirrels broke the silence, then the small twitterings of unseen birds. The best birder among us recognized the calls of golden-crowned kinglets , and then two of the tiny birds accommodated us by flitting between trees.

Thus, after a long walk on an icy trail, on a warm (37 degrees) and overcast morning, just one day short of winter solstice, we had the first bird for our list...

Nancy Lord

Christmas came a week early for many in the Southcentral Alaska village of Tyonek, but gifts arrived not on a sleigh but a Skyvan flown by Alaska Air Taxi.

James Bowers with JW Industries Group, a contract agency that provides logistical support services for the Tyonek Native Council, said two efforts came together with a single plane trip, bringing new wood-burning stoves to many in the community, as well as a turkey for virtually everyone's holiday table.

"Everyone was just so pleased," Bowers said...

Carey Restino | Bristol Bay Times

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