DeeDee Jonrowe is one the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race's biggest names. She bills herself as the "foremost female dog musher competing in the world today," and backs it up with a record including 15 top-10 Iditarod finishes, two in second place.

Despite being only weeks from the start of her 31st Iditarod and as busy as ever, Jonrowe, 59, still had time for digital imaging technicians to come out to her kennel to map the patterns of heat and blood flow in her dogs as they worked.

The idea is to create a digital library of the animals. More blood flow in an area could indicate an injury in its early stages. The technology might be something race veterinarians could deploy during races for a quick look at dogs beginning to struggle, allowing vets to address injuries before they worsen.

Doing all she can to keep her dogs happy and healthy is a theme for Jonrowe. In addition to the infrared scans, Jonrowe built a "dog roadhouse" this summer -- a garage with indoor dog houses -- to keep her animals warm and resting to their potential.

Read more: Jonrowe taps technology in bid for first Iditarod win