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Shelby Lum

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President Barack Obama stepped off Air Force One along with Governor Bill Walker on Monday Aug. 31, 2015. He was greeted on the tarmac and stopped by the crowd that had gathered to meet him."Oh, it's beautiful today," he said through the wind. "It's great to be here."Obama is set to stay in Alaska for three days, speaking at the GLACIER Conference in Anchorage to discuss issues about the Arctic on Monday, then traveling to Seward, Dillingham and Kotzebue.  
Bill Roth
Secretary of State John Kerry told an audience at a State Department conference in Anchorage on Monday that Alaska, with its long human history and dramatic climate-induced changes, is the right place to discuss the future of a changing Arctic.
Alaska Dispatch News
Air Force One landed at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson Monday afternoon to cheers from roughly 180 people assembled. Obama departed Air Force One at 1:45 p.m. with Alaska Gov. Bill Walker, who had flown with the president from Washington, D.C.
Alaska Dispatch News
As Secret Service agents, some with dogs, swarmed inside and around the Hotel Captain Cook in downtown Anchorage this morning, a handful of local businesses had erected signs welcoming President Obama. Rallies later in the day scolded and celebrated the president. 
Bob Hallinen
At an art installation in front of the Anchorage Museum that's part of the GLACIER conference has wood blocks with Arctic words carved in them in English, Alaska Native languages, Russian, Icelandic, Swedish, Finnish and Norwegian. Conference participants and members of the public are encouraged to take a block revealing photographs by Brian Adams, Michael Conti and Jayson Smart.
Shelby Lum

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Visitors wandered up to giant chunks of ice sitting outside of the Anchorage Museum on Sunday and were able to touch pieces of a glacier. On the lawn, there were samples of food and free music performances that were part of a celebration in collaboration with GLACIER, the conference that focuses on the issues in the Arctic and is taking place in Anchorage this week. 
Alaska Dispatch News
It’s official: Denali is now the mountain formerly known as Mt. McKinley.
Bob Hallinen
On Saturday, Aug. 29, 2015 kayakers, packrafters and a rafting class from the University of Alaska Anchorage paddle down the Portage River after launch their watercraft from the outlet of Portage Lake with the Chugach and Kenai Mountains behind them.
Loren Holmes,Lisa Demer

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NEWTOK – The only way to reach the village of Newtok from the airstrip is across an old wooden boardwalk so crooked and broken that a person on foot risks falling between gaps in planks into the marsh below.The school principal hauls his own honey bucket. An aide at the health clinic lives with four others in a one-room home where duct tape patches cracks between walls. Homes tilt at crazy angles after years of sinking unevenly into thawing permafrost.While new houses and modern water and sewer systems lift up lives in some rural communities, government agencies as of late see little reason to invest in eroding villages that everyone is preparing to leave behind.This isolated Southwest Alaska community is disappearing as the land sinks, sea levels rise and the bordering Ninglick River gobbles up an average of one-fourth of a football field a year.“My house used to be down there by the pond, and they had to drag it up here,” said Elsie Stewart, 49, standing on the front steps of her home, moved a few years back after a flood. The hide of a musk ox hunted by her brother lay drying outside. She knits the fine yarn spun from qiviut, the down, into scarves and smokerings, or nachaqs, as part of the Anchorage-based Ooomingmak cooperative.With severe erosion and flooding in Newtok, Stewart is unsure the place she was born and raised will be there for her own children.But Newtok doesn’t intend to lose itself to the creep of climate change. Of more than two dozen threatened Alaska villages, Newtok is the one farthest along in efforts to relocate to new, higher ground.Read more: Newtok not waiting: Disintegrating Alaska village stages move to new siteSee more: Slideshow: Newtok not waiting: Disintegrating Alaska village stages move to new siteWatch this video on YouTube or Vimeo, and be sure to subscribe to our YouTube channel for more.
Loren Holmes,Lisa Demer
Newtok doesn’t intend to lose itself to the creep of climate change. Of more than two dozen threatened Alaska villages, Newtok is the one farthest along in efforts to relocate to new, higher ground.
Shelby Lum
The high school cross-country running season got off to a fast start Saturday on the Bartlett trails.
Alaska Dispatch News
Ten-year-old Sophia Martin, who performs under the name The Girl From the North Country, was born in Valdez but lives in Thorne Bay on Prince of Wales Island.Sophia has been writing and performing songs on the island since she was seven. Creating the music video for the original song "Stubborn Girl" was a family affair. Martin's mother Katie is featured on guitar and her father Isaac plays mandolin, while her two little sisters and little brother play on the beach nearby. Martin wrote the song on the piano one rainy afternoon with Katie by her side.Martin’s biggest performance to date was at the Alaska Folk Festival this past April in Juneau. She is an avid outdoors girl who shot her first deer at age nine and caught her first salmon unassisted when she was eight. Currently she is off on her first moose hunt. For more information about the Martin family and their lives in Thorne Bay, visit their blog, Steal Away North.To submit your video to Alaska Dispatch News, contact Tara Young at tara(at)alaskadispatch.com.

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