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Matt Tunseth
South defeated Dimond in the 4A state volleyball championship match on Saturday at the Alaska Airlines Center.
Beth Bragg
Mt. Edgecumbe beat Monroe on Saturday to claim the 3A state volleyball championship at the Alaska Airlines Center.
Marc Lester
Isidra Castro is passionate about her art, but having tattoos cover much of her body has affected her life in some unpleasant ways, she says. 
Megan Edge
Despite the human race’s rare appearances on Tugidak Island, its footprints have been quite large. Over two years, volunteers collected 83,000 pounds of trash, which mostly consisted of marine debris lost or tossed at sea.
Tara Young,Michelle Theriault Boots

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At night, and especially on weekends, Chilkoot Charlie’s is a raucous cauldron of Anchorage nightlife -- the kind of place that traveling salesmen tell stories about for years after they visit. Maybe no other single bar in Anchorage -- or Alaska -- carries quite such an outsized reputation. Koots, as some patrons call it, has attracted its share of controversy over the years. The club has been the site of high-profile incidents of violence and the subject of a few lawsuits.But in the light of day, an unexpected side of the place emerges. Look closely, and you’ll see Chilkoot Charlie’s is more like a museum, albeit one that smells of spilled beer.Read more: Chilkoot Charlie's: A museum disguised as a barWatch this video on Vimeo or YouTube, and be sure to subscribe to our YouTube channel for more great videos. Contact Tara Young at tara(at)alaskadispatch.com.
Beth Bragg
UAA defeated Holy Names 92-35 on Friday night, Nov. 15, at the Wells Fargo Sports Complex.
First-round of the state high school 3A and 4A volleyball tournament at UAA on Thursday, Nov. 13, 2014.
Mike Dunham
The Anchorage Museum opened three notable exhibits on Nov. 7: the All Alaska Juried Art Show, considered the most important juried art show in the state, the statewide "Rarefied Light" photo competition and a show about Alaska craft materials.
Beth Bragg
With a win over Simon Fraser on Thursday, the UAA volleyball team is guaranteed to post the best winning percentage in program history.
Alaska Dispatch News
Celina Kalluk learned Inuit throat singing from her uncle’s wife in the village of Resolute Bay, Nunavut, in the high Canadian Arctic where she grew up. Her aunt taught her that Inuit throat singing started as a way for women to soothe their babies. "They imitate sounds from their environment -- animals, rivers and dog team, and even cooking and mosquitoes. Mosquitoes in throat-singing sounds beautiful,” Kalluk said in a 2007 interview with The Pure Drop.  “When you’re concentrated on keeping track and keeping on rhythm, even keeping on note with the other person, it’s like you’re sharing the same breath, because you’re overlapping and alternating individual sounds.”Kalluk relocated to Iqaluit, the capital of Nunavut, where she works as a writer and illustrator. Through her children’s book "Sweetest Kulu" and her work on children's schoolbooks, Kalluk has been helping preserve the Inuktitut language.The throat-singing sisters Karin and Kathy Kettler, together known as Nukariik, are also doing their part to preserve the culture of their Nunavut ancestors.Read more: Inuit throat-singing sisters from Canada
Alaska Dispatch News
In the early morning hours of November 3, local photographer Kerry Tasker looked out the window to saw the aurora borealis in the sky. At 3 a.m. he headed out to the bluffs in South Anchorage to record this lovely time-lapse of the northern lights. (Music composed by Anchorage musician Ivan Night).
Tara Young

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Being deaf brings isolation, says Randy Rutherford. Sometimes the isolation is self-imposed. “When I got the bad news, I pushed everybody away,” he said. “I locked myself in a trailer and felt very sorry for myself for about seven months.” Eventually he had to leave the trailer and return to the world, however difficult the step might be. “I was getting lonely. I had to get out and meet people.”Rutherford first came to Alaska in the 1960s. He was tending bar at the Gaslight Lounge and made friends with the folk singers who performed on Tuesday nights. They asked him to step on the little stage and sing a song from time to time. He discovered he liked it. “I was looking for any excuse to get on stage.”Then he discovered he was losing his hearing. But although it was hard to understand what people were saying, he continued to hear the call of the stage loud and clear. “I discovered that if an audience is quiet, I can still sing,” he said. He began to craft autobiographical one-man shows. “It’s a heartbreaking love story about when I was a folk singer in Anchorage,” he said. “But it’s also uplifting, inspirational, about coming out, facing the challenges and obstacles of life.”Randy Rutherford performs his latest musical memoir Singing at the Edge of the World at Tap Root November 15-16, 2014 at 7 p.m.Read more: Distant voices: Randy Rutherford's musical memoirWatch this video on Vimeo or YouTube, and be sure to subscribe to our YouTube channel for more great videos. Contact Tara Young at tara(at)alaskadispatch.com.

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