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Alaska Public Media

I Am An Ice Fisherman | INDIE ALASKA

INDIE ALASKA is an original video series produced by Alaska Public Media in partnership with PBS Digital Studios. The weekly series captures the diverse and colorful lifestyles of everyday Alaskans at work and at play. Together, these videos present a fresh and authentic look at living in Alaska.In this episode we meet Elmer Brown, an ice fisherman who knows that it takes patience, and a willingness to weather the cold, to catch sheefish on Kotzebue Sound.
Alaska Dispatch News

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Massachusetts has gotten its share of winter weather this year. With record snowstorms and low temperatures, ice floes formed along the Northern Atlantic and flowed down to New England.That spelled opportunity for Florida-based athlete and pioneer wakeskater Brian Grubb. He decided to head to the small Massachusetts town of Wellfleet in Cape Cod to shred the icy landscape.  Wakeskating combines of waterskiing, snowboarding and surfing techniques. A wakeboard rides over the water, ice and snow, much like skateboarding with no bindings to hold down your feet.Tackling the ice floes of Cape Cod required a significant amount of prep work. The line had to be groomed and a winch-pull system set up. Since skating over water required more speed than skating over snow, the team had to make a number of test runs. But once they got the timing right, Grubb was able to negotiate the car-sized mounds of ice that covered the landscape.Grubb, who lives in Orlando, told Fox News it was cold in Cape Cod. "We didn't get an exact temperature, but, yeah, it was probably in the 30s or low 40s or something," Grubb said. "With all that ice in there, it was definitely cold. It was pretty windy that day, so the wind chill was definitely cutting through (my wetsuit)."Red Bull Media House captured the moment in this lively wakeskating video. Gubb said of his wakeskating collaboration with Red Bull, “We ultimately just want to inspire people to think outside the box and maybe take a sport you would only see in the summertime into the winter and the snow.”
Alaska Public Media

I Run a Custom Knife Shop | INDIE ALASKA

Indie Alaska is an original video series produced by Alaska Public Media in partnership with PBS Digital Studios. The weekly series captures the diverse and colorful lifestyles of everyday Alaskans at work and at play. Together, these videos present a fresh and authentic look at living in Alaska.In this episode, for Virgil and Dawn Campbell, making and selling knives is a way of life. The I.R.B.I. ("I'd Rather Be Independent") knife shop on the Seward highway has been in the family for three generations and serves as workshop and a landmark for passers-by from near and far.
Alaska Dispatch News

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Brig. Gen. Laurie Hummel, adjutant general of the Alaska National Guard and commissioner of the Department of Military & Veterans Affairs, presided over a ceremony on Sunday, March 22, 2015 where Brig. Gen. Leon M. “Mike” Bridges handed over the reigns of command of the Alaska Army National Guard to Col. Joseph Streff.Bridges will retire May 1, 2015. He had served as commander of the Army National Guard since January 2012.Read more: Top leaders in Alaska National Guard set to retire
Alaska Public Media

I Am A Winter Cyclist | INDIE ALASKA

Indie Alaska is an original video series produced by Alaska Public Media in partnership with PBS Digital Studios. The weekly series captures the diverse and colorful lifestyles of everyday Alaskans at work and at play. Together, these videos present a fresh and authentic look at living in Alaska.In this episode, winter weather won't stop Ellie Mitchell from hitting the road (or the trail) on her fat bike. She picked up cycling from her dad, and now she regularly competes against him and other cyclists in the Anchorage winter racing circuit.  
Alaska Dispatch News

NASA | Measuring Mars' Ancient Ocean

Scientists believe that an ancient Martian ocean held more water than the Arctic Ocean on Earth. It once covered what is now the planet's arid northern plains and would have contained at least 20 million cubic kilometers (12.4 million cubic miles) of water. That was during the planet's wet Noachian period, which ended about 3.7 billion years ago when life was just emerging on Earth, according to NASA Goddard. This new picture of early Mars raises the odds for the possibility of ancient life existing on the Red Planet.
Marc Lester

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NOME -- There was a sickening pop, followed by an eerie silence as the crowd inside Breakers Bar realized what they’d witnessed: Aliy Zirkle had just broken some woman's arm. Grace Liu learned a painful lesson about tangling with mushers Wednesday night in Nome when Zirkle, a 45-year-old sled dog racing superstar from Two Rivers, snapped the California lawyer’s arm like a piece of driftwood during an arm-wrestling match just hours after the 15-time Iditarod finisher guided her team to a fifth-place finish in the 2015 Iditarod.“Everyone gasped,” said Liu, a 36-year-old patent lawyer from Fresno. “And you know it takes a lot to quiet a bar in Nome.”Zirkle said it was her first arm-wrestling contest. And likely her last.“God, I feel bad,” she said Friday.Read more: Post-Iditarod arm-wrestling match leaves fan with broken bone and musher Zirkle mortified 
Marc Lester

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NOME -- Her blistered, frostbitten fingertips covered in tape, the iron lady of Alaska sled dog racing collapsed into a snowbank early Thursday morning in Nome and let out a deep, satisfied sigh.“It really feels good to get off my feet,” said Willow’s DeeDee Jonrowe, who finished 31st after nearly 11 days on the Iditarod trail.With 30 Iditarod finishes behind her, perhaps the most beloved musher in the field had earned a break.Clad in her omnipresent pink parka, Jonrowe took time in the predawn hours to discuss her sled dog racing legacy and reflect on her accomplishments during more than three decades of running Alaska huskies across the wild. Though she said she has no plans to retire, Jonrowe admitted this year’s race was one of the toughest.“This wasn’t a bad race, just a hard race,” she said.Read more: Weary, frostbitten DeeDee Jonrowe, iron lady of the Iditarod, finishes 30th race
Marc Lester

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Paige Drobny was certain she had 26th place wrapped up in the 2015 Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. Her dogs had other ideas.Drobny was leading her friendly competitor Scott Smith into Nome on Thursday after running with the Willow musher since Shaktoolik, after Drobny was slowed by a wrong turn in bad weather at Unalakleet and was delayed by six hours while Iditarod crews set additional markers along the windswept trail.Read more: Doggie detour on Front Street costs musher Drobny 26th place
Bill Roth

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More than 400 paratroopers jumped from U.S. Air Force C-17 Globemaster aircraft Wednesday as part of an extensive training exercise at the Malamute Drop Zone on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson.
Alaska Dispatch News
Alaska photographer and filmmaker Luc Mehl and eight friends decided to ride fat-tire bikes from McGrath to Anchorage. Growing up in McGrath, Mehl never imaged he’d one day ride a bike all the way to Anchorage, but with the lack of snow this winter it seemed like the perfect conditions for a cycling adventure. The group was welcomed to re-supply their water along the Iditarod Trail Invitational by organizer Kathi Merchant. They traveled on packed snowmachine trails up the Kuskokwim, past Big River and to Nikolai, according to Mehl’s blog. “All of the terrain was familiar to me, flat tundra, black spruce, white spruce, birch stands, marshes, and huge meanders in the Kuskokwim,” says Mehl.
Marc Lester

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As late-night partiers flooded onto Front Street, Dallas Seavey’s claimed a third Iditarod championship early Wednesday morning. The 28-year-old's wispy blonde goatee was coated in frost by the 10-degree temperatures as he crossed the finish line at 4:13 a.m. Fans reached out to give the three-time champion high-fives as he neared the finish line. After setting his hook, Seavey stopped to hug each dog individually, then shared hugs with members of the Seavey clan gathered under the bright lights.Upon being congratulated by a bystander, Seavey uttered the words all race-watchers already knew.“We got ‘er done,” he said.Combined with his father's win in 2013, Dallas's win Wednesday gave the Seavey family title to victories in four straight Iditarods. Father Mitch crossed the finish line second at 8:23 a.m., cementing the first one-two Iditarod finish by a parent-child combo.  It was also the most lucrative finish in race history -- $128,600 for father and son, plus a new Dodge truck for the youngster.Dallas immediately gave full credit to the dogs."As long as you take care of the dog team and make good decisions, good things will happen,'' he said. "We loved every second of it."READ MORE: Dallas Seavey cruises to third Iditarod crown 

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