Slideshow: Alaska volcano monitors failing after years of federal funding cuts

Fourpeaked Mountain steam plumes are backlit by the sun in October of 2006. Part of a seismic station is visible in the foreground. Decreasing federal funding since 2009 has left the Alaska Volcano Observatory unable to monitor five volcanoes, including Fourpeaked Mountain, for seismic activity that can help predict eruptions.
Kay Lawson
Scientist-in-Charge John Power of the Alaska Volcano Observatory holds a seismometer on Monday, Feb. 24, 2014, at the Alaska Pacific University campus. Decreasing federal funding since 2009 has left the Alaska Volcano Observatory unable to monitor five volcanoes.
Erik Hill
John Power of the Alaska Volcano Observatory stands in front of seismograms displaying ground motion recorded by seismic instruments located on Alaska volcanoes on Monday, Feb. 24, 2014, at the Alaska Pacific University campus. Decreasing federal funding since 2009 has left the Alaska Volcano Observatory unable to monitor five volcanoes.
Erik Hill
An aerial view of snow-covered, six-mile-wide, Aniakchak Caldera is seen on the Alaska Peninsula in March 2011. Decreasing federal funding since 2009 has left the Alaska Volcano Observatory unable to monitor five volcanoes, including Aniakchak, for seismic activity that can help predict eruptions.
Roy W. Wood
Craig Medred