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Moon rocks return

A finger adds scale to the tiny fragments of moon rock that were accompanied by a state flag in the plaque presented by President Richard Nixon to Gov. Keith Miller in 1969. The plaque and rocks disappeared following a 1973 fire at the Alaska Transportation Museum in Anchorage, and were displayed again to Alaskans upon their overnight return to the state Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building.
Erik Hill
Alaska State Museum curator of collections Steve Henrikson displays a plaque containing fragments of moon rock from the 1969 Apollo 11 mission which were returned to Alaska overnight at a Thursday meeting of the Alaska State Board of Education and Early Development Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building. Commissioner Mike Hanley of the Dept. of Education & Early Development, left, appreciates the moment as he has oversight of state museums, archives and libraries. The moon rocks disappeared following a 1973 fire at the Alaska Transportation Museum in Anchorage. Former Alaskan Arthur Anderson recently turned them over following a failed court bid to assert ownership.
Erik Hill
Tiny fragments of moon rock were accompanied by a state flag in the plaque presented by President Richard Nixon to Gov. Keith Miller in 1969. The plaque and rocks disappeared following a 1973 fire at the Alaska Transportation Museum in Anchorage, and were displayed again to Alaskans upon their overnight return to the state Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building.
Erik Hill
Alaska State Museum curator of collections Steve Henrikson displays a plaque containing fragments of moon rock from the 1969 Apollo 11 mission which were returned to Alaska overnight at a Thursday meeting of the Alaska State Board of Education and Early Development Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building.
Erik Hill
Alaska State Museum curator of collections Steve Henrikson displays a plaque containing fragments of moon rock from the 1969 Apollo 11 mission following their return to Alaska at a press conference Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building. He is flanked by state Assistant Attorney General Neil Slotnick, left, and Supervisory Special Agent Andrew Walton of the FBI, right.
Erik Hill
U.S. Attorney Karen Loeffler addresses a press conference following the overnight return of a plaque containing fragments of moon rock from the 1969 Apollo 11 mission Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building.
Erik Hill
Assistant Attorney General Neil Slotnick displays a photo that helped authenticate moon rocks and a plaque returned overnight to Alaska Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building.
Erik Hill
Jamie Stotts leaves her cubicle to check out moon rocks Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building.
Erik Hill
Students from Highland Tech High School photograph a plaque containing moon rocks following a news conference Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building.
Erik Hill
Students from Highland Tech High School photograph a plaque containing moon rocks following a news conference Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building.
Erik Hill
Tiny fragments of moon rock and the plaque presented by President Richard Nixon to Gov. Keith Miller in 1969 attract attention following a press conference Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building. The plaque and rocks disappeared following a 1973 fire at the Alaska Transportation Museum in Anchorage, and were displayed again to Alaskans upon their overnight return to the state.
Erik Hill
Authorities sought means to authenticate the moon rocks and plaque in possession of former Alaskan Arthur Anderson, and Marie White of Washington state provided this photo after reading an article in the Seattle Times newspaper. She and her brother Gene held the plaque in the dining room of their family's Atlasta House lodge in Glennallen following its 1970 display in the school gymnasium. Their father headed the school science fair committee, and the plaque spent the night at the lodge. The FBI and NASA used the photo to help confirm Anderson's plaque as authentic.
Erik Hill
Tiny fragments of moon rock were accompanied by a state flag in the plaque presented by President Richard Nixon to Gov. Keith Miller in 1969. The plaque and rocks disappeared following a 1973 fire at the Alaska Transportation Museum in Anchorage, and were displayed again to Alaskans upon their overnight return to the state Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building.
Erik Hill
A finger adds scale to the tiny fragments of moon rock that were accompanied by a state flag in the plaque presented by President Richard Nixon to Gov. Keith Miller in 1969. The plaque and rocks disappeared following a 1973 fire at the Alaska Transportation Museum in Anchorage, and were displayed again to Alaskans upon their overnight return to the state Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building.
Erik Hill
Alaska State Museum curator of collections Steve Henrikson displays a plaque containing fragments of moon rock from the 1969 Apollo 11 mission which were returned to Alaska overnight at a Thursday meeting of the Alaska State Board of Education and Early Development Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building. Commissioner Mike Hanley of the Dept. of Education & Early Development, left, appreciates the moment as he has oversight of state museums, archives and libraries. The moon rocks disappeared following a 1973 fire at the Alaska Transportation Museum in Anchorage. Former Alaskan Arthur Anderson recently turned them over following a failed court bid to assert ownership.
Erik Hill
Tiny fragments of moon rock were accompanied by a state flag in the plaque presented by President Richard Nixon to Gov. Keith Miller in 1969. The plaque and rocks disappeared following a 1973 fire at the Alaska Transportation Museum in Anchorage, and were displayed again to Alaskans upon their overnight return to the state Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building.
Erik Hill
Alaska State Museum curator of collections Steve Henrikson displays a plaque containing fragments of moon rock from the 1969 Apollo 11 mission which were returned to Alaska overnight at a Thursday meeting of the Alaska State Board of Education and Early Development Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building.
Erik Hill
Alaska State Museum curator of collections Steve Henrikson displays a plaque containing fragments of moon rock from the 1969 Apollo 11 mission following their return to Alaska at a press conference Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building. He is flanked by state Assistant Attorney General Neil Slotnick, left, and Supervisory Special Agent Andrew Walton of the FBI, right.
Erik Hill
U.S. Attorney Karen Loeffler addresses a press conference following the overnight return of a plaque containing fragments of moon rock from the 1969 Apollo 11 mission Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building.
Erik Hill
Assistant Attorney General Neil Slotnick displays a photo that helped authenticate moon rocks and a plaque returned overnight to Alaska Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building.
Erik Hill
Jamie Stotts leaves her cubicle to check out moon rocks Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building.
Erik Hill
Students from Highland Tech High School photograph a plaque containing moon rocks following a news conference Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building.
Erik Hill
Students from Highland Tech High School photograph a plaque containing moon rocks following a news conference Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building.
Erik Hill
Tiny fragments of moon rock and the plaque presented by President Richard Nixon to Gov. Keith Miller in 1969 attract attention following a press conference Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building. The plaque and rocks disappeared following a 1973 fire at the Alaska Transportation Museum in Anchorage, and were displayed again to Alaskans upon their overnight return to the state.
Erik Hill
Authorities sought means to authenticate the moon rocks and plaque in possession of former Alaskan Arthur Anderson, and Marie White of Washington state provided this photo after reading an article in the Seattle Times newspaper. She and her brother Gene held the plaque in the dining room of their family's Atlasta House lodge in Glennallen following its 1970 display in the school gymnasium. Their father headed the school science fair committee, and the plaque spent the night at the lodge. The FBI and NASA used the photo to help confirm Anderson's plaque as authentic.
Erik Hill
Tiny fragments of moon rock were accompanied by a state flag in the plaque presented by President Richard Nixon to Gov. Keith Miller in 1969. The plaque and rocks disappeared following a 1973 fire at the Alaska Transportation Museum in Anchorage, and were displayed again to Alaskans upon their overnight return to the state Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building.
Erik Hill
A finger adds scale to the tiny fragments of moon rock that were accompanied by a state flag in the plaque presented by President Richard Nixon to Gov. Keith Miller in 1969. The plaque and rocks disappeared following a 1973 fire at the Alaska Transportation Museum in Anchorage, and were displayed again to Alaskans upon their overnight return to the state Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building.
Erik Hill
Alaska State Museum curator of collections Steve Henrikson displays a plaque containing fragments of moon rock from the 1969 Apollo 11 mission which were returned to Alaska overnight at a Thursday meeting of the Alaska State Board of Education and Early Development Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building. Commissioner Mike Hanley of the Dept. of Education & Early Development, left, appreciates the moment as he has oversight of state museums, archives and libraries. The moon rocks disappeared following a 1973 fire at the Alaska Transportation Museum in Anchorage. Former Alaskan Arthur Anderson recently turned them over following a failed court bid to assert ownership.
Erik Hill
Tiny fragments of moon rock were accompanied by a state flag in the plaque presented by President Richard Nixon to Gov. Keith Miller in 1969. The plaque and rocks disappeared following a 1973 fire at the Alaska Transportation Museum in Anchorage, and were displayed again to Alaskans upon their overnight return to the state Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building.
Erik Hill
Alaska State Museum curator of collections Steve Henrikson displays a plaque containing fragments of moon rock from the 1969 Apollo 11 mission which were returned to Alaska overnight at a Thursday meeting of the Alaska State Board of Education and Early Development Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building.
Erik Hill
Alaska State Museum curator of collections Steve Henrikson displays a plaque containing fragments of moon rock from the 1969 Apollo 11 mission following their return to Alaska at a press conference Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building. He is flanked by state Assistant Attorney General Neil Slotnick, left, and Supervisory Special Agent Andrew Walton of the FBI, right.
Erik Hill
U.S. Attorney Karen Loeffler addresses a press conference following the overnight return of a plaque containing fragments of moon rock from the 1969 Apollo 11 mission Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building.
Erik Hill
Assistant Attorney General Neil Slotnick displays a photo that helped authenticate moon rocks and a plaque returned overnight to Alaska Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building.
Erik Hill
Jamie Stotts leaves her cubicle to check out moon rocks Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building.
Erik Hill
Students from Highland Tech High School photograph a plaque containing moon rocks following a news conference Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building.
Erik Hill
Students from Highland Tech High School photograph a plaque containing moon rocks following a news conference Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building.
Erik Hill
Tiny fragments of moon rock and the plaque presented by President Richard Nixon to Gov. Keith Miller in 1969 attract attention following a press conference Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building. The plaque and rocks disappeared following a 1973 fire at the Alaska Transportation Museum in Anchorage, and were displayed again to Alaskans upon their overnight return to the state.
Erik Hill
Authorities sought means to authenticate the moon rocks and plaque in possession of former Alaskan Arthur Anderson, and Marie White of Washington state provided this photo after reading an article in the Seattle Times newspaper. She and her brother Gene held the plaque in the dining room of their family's Atlasta House lodge in Glennallen following its 1970 display in the school gymnasium. Their father headed the school science fair committee, and the plaque spent the night at the lodge. The FBI and NASA used the photo to help confirm Anderson's plaque as authentic.
Erik Hill
Tiny fragments of moon rock were accompanied by a state flag in the plaque presented by President Richard Nixon to Gov. Keith Miller in 1969. The plaque and rocks disappeared following a 1973 fire at the Alaska Transportation Museum in Anchorage, and were displayed again to Alaskans upon their overnight return to the state Thursday Dec. 6, 2012 at the Anchorage School District administration building.
Erik Hill
Craig Medred