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Sixty-seven Alaskans become U.S. citizens

Fiso Kilifi of Western Samoa stands for the Pledge of Allegiance during the ceremony to become a U.S. citizen. Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Pvt. 1st Class Yasset Figueroa has his picture taken with other members of the Army's 1st Squadron (Airborne), 40th Cavalry, after Figueroa became a U. S. citizen Friday. First Lt. Andrew Shellenberger said they wanted to show their support. "He's been working really hard on this," he said. Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Ruddy Abam of Cameroon looks at her certificate of naturalization. Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Members of the Army's 1st Squadron (Airborne), 40th Cavalry, attend the naturalization ceremony to support Pvt. 1st Class Yasset Figueroa. Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Eva Marie Tabilas hold her daughter Jennaya, 2, after the ceremony to become a U.S. citizen. Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Evangeline Bertels gives her husband, Kim, a kiss after receiving her naturalization certificate. Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Pedro Aristy of Dominican Republic stands for the Pledge of Allegiance. Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Immigration services officer Sara Hardgrove, right, gives a certificate of naturalization. Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
A video message by President Barak Obama is played during the ceremony. Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Cleo Reyes, Camilo Reyes and Maria Theresa Reyes, of the Philippines, hold their certificates of naturalization. Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Pvt. 1st Class Yasset Figueroa takes the oath of allegiance. Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
The Reyes family registers to vote with help from Tina DeLapp, left, of League of Women Voters.Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Immigration services officer Sara Hardgrove, right, gets a hug after giving a certificate of naturalization. Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Wiranda Todd of Thailand holds her naturalization certificate. Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Fiso Kilifi of Western Samoa stands for the Pledge of Allegiance during the ceremony to become a U.S. citizen. Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Pvt. 1st Class Yasset Figueroa has his picture taken with other members of the Army's 1st Squadron (Airborne), 40th Cavalry, after Figueroa became a U. S. citizen Friday. First Lt. Andrew Shellenberger said they wanted to show their support. "He's been working really hard on this," he said. Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Ruddy Abam of Cameroon looks at her certificate of naturalization. Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Members of the Army's 1st Squadron (Airborne), 40th Cavalry, attend the naturalization ceremony to support Pvt. 1st Class Yasset Figueroa. Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Eva Marie Tabilas hold her daughter Jennaya, 2, after the ceremony to become a U.S. citizen. Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Evangeline Bertels gives her husband, Kim, a kiss after receiving her naturalization certificate. Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Pedro Aristy of Dominican Republic stands for the Pledge of Allegiance. Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Immigration services officer Sara Hardgrove, right, gives a certificate of naturalization. Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
A video message by President Barak Obama is played during the ceremony. Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Cleo Reyes, Camilo Reyes and Maria Theresa Reyes, of the Philippines, hold their certificates of naturalization. Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Pvt. 1st Class Yasset Figueroa takes the oath of allegiance. Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
The Reyes family registers to vote with help from Tina DeLapp, left, of League of Women Voters.Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Immigration services officer Sara Hardgrove, right, gets a hug after giving a certificate of naturalization. Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Wiranda Todd of Thailand holds her naturalization certificate. Sixty-seven people from about 25 countries took the oath of allegiance and became U.S. citizens during a naturalization ceremony held at the Wilda Marston Theatre at the Loussac Library on Friday, June 14, 2013. The ceremony, conducted by U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, is one of several held each year at various locations around Alaska. Sara Hardgrove, the immigration services officer that hosted Friday's event, said applicants usually acquire a green card first, then must demonstrate they can read, write, speak and understand English. Prospective citizens must also learn U.S. civics and history. Hardgrove says citizenship ceremonies are her favorite part of her job. "You can see how proud they are," she said. "Their families are here. There's tears in their eyes." On average 70-100 people are naturalized each month in Alaska.
Marc Lester
Alaska Dispatch