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Ocean acidification affects crab populations

Deckhands aboard the crab boat Arctic Hunter in the Bering Sea off Alaska separate male and female snow crab, March 21, 2013. Red king crab are highly susceptible to changes in water chemistry, which raises concerns about whether snow crab will be, too.
Steve Ringman
Graduate student Asia Beder holds a mature red king crab pulled from a tank at the Alutiiq Pride Shellfish Hatchery in Seward, Alaska, March 21, 2013. New research suggests ocean acidification poses a significant threat to Alaska's famed red king crab industry.
Steve Ringman
Young red king crab are being raised in a shellfish hatchery in Seward, Alaska, as part of an experimental effort to provide options for troubled wild populations.
Steve Ringman
A crew member aboard the Arctic Hunter beats ice from the knuckle boom before using it to pull crab pots aboard. Frozen spray from a stormy night at sea had buried the empty pots on the boat's stern in thick layers of ice.
Steve Ringman
Crew members aboard the crab boat Arctic Hunter are nailed with spray flying over the bow as they maneuver crab pots in the stormy Bering Sea, March 26, 2013.
Steve Ringman
Below deck on the Arctic Hunter, workers from Westward Seafood unload snow crab at the dock in Dutch Harbor, Alaska, March 21, 2013. While scientists have struggled to study the direct effects of ocean acidification on snow crab, related research on other crab species suggests they, too, might be susceptible.
Steve Ringman
Craig Medred