AD Main Menu

Kotzebue thanksgiving

Photo by Jimmie Evak On Nov. 25, 2013, price per pound for Butterball turkeys was 2.38 at the AC Store in Kotzebue.
Jimmie Evak
Photo by Jimmie Evak Butterball turkeys, costing 2.38 a pound at the local AC store, are bought and cooked by volunteers to be served at the annual Thanksgiving feast held at the Kotzebue Friend's Church, which was established in 1897.
Jimmie Evak
Photo by Jimmie Evak Caribou (rangifer turandus, L) is call 'tuttu' by the Inupiat of NW Alaska. Caribou is served in different ways during a Thanksgiving feast in Kotzebue. It can be eaten frozen and raw with seal oil, roasted, made into stews or soups, etc. Here it is being diced to add to beans for a caribou chili. Chili will be made in the regular way with an Inupiaq twist. Beans are called 'nilignaq' in Inupiaq because they make you 'niliq' or 'blow gas'.
Jimmie Evak
Photo by Jimmie Evak Caribou (rangifer turandus, L) is call 'tuttu' by the Inupiat of NW Alaska. Caribou is served in different ways during a Thanksgiving feast in Kotzebue. It can be eaten frozen and raw with seal oil, roasted, made into stews or soups, etc. Here it is being diced to add to beans for a caribou chili. Chili will be made in the regular way with an Inupiaq twist. Beans are called 'nilignaq' in Inupiaq because they make you 'niliq' or 'blow gas'.
Jimmie Evak
Photo by Jimmie Evak The Friend's Church holds an annual Thanksgiving feast and has done so for many years. The building where it is held in Kotzebue was a church at first, then a bigger one was built. This old church is used for holiday feasts and funeral potlucks, holiday bazaars, wedding receptions, etc. Although the tables are empty the day before Thanksgiving, dozens will come together for the annual Thanksgiving feast. The elders will sit and be served, while the younger people will get their own servings.
Jimmie Evak
Photo by Jimmie Evak The Friend's Church holds an annual Thanksgiving feast and has done so for many years. The building where it is held in Kotzebue was a church at first, then a bigger one was built. This old church is used for holiday feasts and funeral potlucks, holiday bazaars, wedding receptions, etc. Although the tables are empty the day before Thanksgiving, dozens will come together for the annual Thanksgiving feast. The elders will sit and be served, while the younger people will get their own servings.
Jimmie Evak
Photo by Jimmie Evak The night before Thanksgiving, a service will be held in the 'new' Friend's Church, where parishioners will express their gratitude to God by testimony and song. This Friend's Church was established in 1897 in Kotzebue and has churches in every village in the NANA Region. Region-wide conferences are held in midwinter, usually March, and midsummer, usually July, where hundreds of followers attend these events. Picture taken November 27, 2013 at 12:42 pm.
Jimmie Evak
Photo by Jimmie Evak Sheefish is cut into small pieces using a bandsaw in preparation for the Thanksgiving feast in Kotzebue. The sheefish, when eaten raw, is usually eaten with seal oil. The skin is taken off and then cut into bite-size pieces with a knife or ulu. The Inupiaq word for sheefish is 'sii', while the white men say 'inconnu', the Latin name is 'Stendous leueichthys nelma'. In the Kotzebue area, the sheefish can reach to over 4 feet long, and can weigh over 50 pounds. In order to prepare for a thanksgiving feast, in which they may be eaten frozen and raw, the fish are cut with a bandsaw and served to all who come to the feast. The sheefish, when eaten raw, is usually eaten with seal oil. The person who eats this, takes the skin off and then cuts it to bite-size pieces with a knife or ulu.
Jimmie Evak
Photo by Jimmie Evak The Inupiaq word for sheefish is 'sii', while the white men say 'inconnu', the Latin name is 'Stendous leueichthys nelma'. In the Kotzebue area, the sheefish can reach to over 4 feet long, and can weigh over 50 pounds. In order to prepare for a thanksgiving feast, in which they may be eaten frozen and raw, the fish are cut with a bandsaw and served to all who come to the feast. The sheefish, when eaten raw, is usually eaten with seal oil. The person who eats this, takes the skin off and then cuts it to bite-size pieces with a knife or ulu.
Jimmie Evak
Photo by Jimmie Evak On Nov. 25, 2013, price per pound for Butterball turkeys was 2.38 at the AC Store in Kotzebue.
Jimmie Evak
Photo by Jimmie Evak Butterball turkeys, costing 2.38 a pound at the local AC store, are bought and cooked by volunteers to be served at the annual Thanksgiving feast held at the Kotzebue Friend's Church, which was established in 1897.
Jimmie Evak
Photo by Jimmie Evak Caribou (rangifer turandus, L) is call 'tuttu' by the Inupiat of NW Alaska. Caribou is served in different ways during a Thanksgiving feast in Kotzebue. It can be eaten frozen and raw with seal oil, roasted, made into stews or soups, etc. Here it is being diced to add to beans for a caribou chili. Chili will be made in the regular way with an Inupiaq twist. Beans are called 'nilignaq' in Inupiaq because they make you 'niliq' or 'blow gas'.
Jimmie Evak
Photo by Jimmie Evak Caribou (rangifer turandus, L) is call 'tuttu' by the Inupiat of NW Alaska. Caribou is served in different ways during a Thanksgiving feast in Kotzebue. It can be eaten frozen and raw with seal oil, roasted, made into stews or soups, etc. Here it is being diced to add to beans for a caribou chili. Chili will be made in the regular way with an Inupiaq twist. Beans are called 'nilignaq' in Inupiaq because they make you 'niliq' or 'blow gas'.
Jimmie Evak
Photo by Jimmie Evak The Friend's Church holds an annual Thanksgiving feast and has done so for many years. The building where it is held in Kotzebue was a church at first, then a bigger one was built. This old church is used for holiday feasts and funeral potlucks, holiday bazaars, wedding receptions, etc. Although the tables are empty the day before Thanksgiving, dozens will come together for the annual Thanksgiving feast. The elders will sit and be served, while the younger people will get their own servings.
Jimmie Evak
Photo by Jimmie Evak The Friend's Church holds an annual Thanksgiving feast and has done so for many years. The building where it is held in Kotzebue was a church at first, then a bigger one was built. This old church is used for holiday feasts and funeral potlucks, holiday bazaars, wedding receptions, etc. Although the tables are empty the day before Thanksgiving, dozens will come together for the annual Thanksgiving feast. The elders will sit and be served, while the younger people will get their own servings.
Jimmie Evak
Photo by Jimmie Evak The night before Thanksgiving, a service will be held in the 'new' Friend's Church, where parishioners will express their gratitude to God by testimony and song. This Friend's Church was established in 1897 in Kotzebue and has churches in every village in the NANA Region. Region-wide conferences are held in midwinter, usually March, and midsummer, usually July, where hundreds of followers attend these events. Picture taken November 27, 2013 at 12:42 pm.
Jimmie Evak
Photo by Jimmie Evak Sheefish is cut into small pieces using a bandsaw in preparation for the Thanksgiving feast in Kotzebue. The sheefish, when eaten raw, is usually eaten with seal oil. The skin is taken off and then cut into bite-size pieces with a knife or ulu. The Inupiaq word for sheefish is 'sii', while the white men say 'inconnu', the Latin name is 'Stendous leueichthys nelma'. In the Kotzebue area, the sheefish can reach to over 4 feet long, and can weigh over 50 pounds. In order to prepare for a thanksgiving feast, in which they may be eaten frozen and raw, the fish are cut with a bandsaw and served to all who come to the feast. The sheefish, when eaten raw, is usually eaten with seal oil. The person who eats this, takes the skin off and then cuts it to bite-size pieces with a knife or ulu.
Jimmie Evak
Photo by Jimmie Evak The Inupiaq word for sheefish is 'sii', while the white men say 'inconnu', the Latin name is 'Stendous leueichthys nelma'. In the Kotzebue area, the sheefish can reach to over 4 feet long, and can weigh over 50 pounds. In order to prepare for a thanksgiving feast, in which they may be eaten frozen and raw, the fish are cut with a bandsaw and served to all who come to the feast. The sheefish, when eaten raw, is usually eaten with seal oil. The person who eats this, takes the skin off and then cuts it to bite-size pieces with a knife or ulu.
Jimmie Evak
Craig Medred