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Iditarod comes to Huffman Elementary

Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley introduces kindergartner Kuhdarion Andersen to sled dog Ears on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Rookie musher Katherine Keith, her sled and Ears were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Kindergartners ask questions as Iditarod rookie musher Katherine Keith of Kotzebue talks about the contents of her sled on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Keith, her sled and dog "Ears" were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley, left, and Kim Fox of ExxonMobil speak as kindergartners flock around rookie musher Katherine Keith of Kotzebue and her dog Ears on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Keith, her sled and Ears were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Fox and Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Paper huskies represent students participating in the I-Did-A-Read program on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Rookie Iditarod musher Katherine Keith, her sled and dog Ears were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Kindergartners meet sled dog Ears as rookie musher Katherine Keith of Kotzebue pays a visit on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Keith, her sled and Ears were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Sixth grader Austin Barker advances his husky dog cutout to Nikolai as part of an I-Did-A-Read program on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Students updated their reading progress in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Kindergartners ask questions as Iditarod rookie musher Katherine Keith of Kotzebue talks about the contents of her sled on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Keith, her sled and dog "Ears" were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley, left, listens as school I-Did-A-Read coordinator Kelly Tirpack speaks on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Rookie musher Katherine Keith, her sled and dog Ears were also at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Paper huskies represent students participating in the I-Did-A-Read program on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Rookie Iditarod musher Katherine Keith, her sled and dog Ears were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley introduces kindergartner Kuhdarion Andersen to sled dog Ears on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Rookie musher Katherine Keith, her sled and Ears were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Kindergartners ask questions as Iditarod rookie musher Katherine Keith of Kotzebue talks about the contents of her sled on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Keith, her sled and dog "Ears" were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley, left, and Kim Fox of ExxonMobil speak as kindergartners flock around rookie musher Katherine Keith of Kotzebue and her dog Ears on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Keith, her sled and Ears were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Fox and Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Paper huskies represent students participating in the I-Did-A-Read program on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Rookie Iditarod musher Katherine Keith, her sled and dog Ears were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Kindergartners meet sled dog Ears as rookie musher Katherine Keith of Kotzebue pays a visit on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Keith, her sled and Ears were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Sixth grader Austin Barker advances his husky dog cutout to Nikolai as part of an I-Did-A-Read program on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Students updated their reading progress in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Kindergartners ask questions as Iditarod rookie musher Katherine Keith of Kotzebue talks about the contents of her sled on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Keith, her sled and dog "Ears" were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley, left, listens as school I-Did-A-Read coordinator Kelly Tirpack speaks on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Rookie musher Katherine Keith, her sled and dog Ears were also at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Paper huskies represent students participating in the I-Did-A-Read program on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Rookie Iditarod musher Katherine Keith, her sled and dog Ears were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley introduces kindergartner Kuhdarion Andersen to sled dog Ears on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Rookie musher Katherine Keith, her sled and Ears were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Kindergartners ask questions as Iditarod rookie musher Katherine Keith of Kotzebue talks about the contents of her sled on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Keith, her sled and dog "Ears" were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley, left, and Kim Fox of ExxonMobil speak as kindergartners flock around rookie musher Katherine Keith of Kotzebue and her dog Ears on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Keith, her sled and Ears were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Fox and Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Paper huskies represent students participating in the I-Did-A-Read program on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Rookie Iditarod musher Katherine Keith, her sled and dog Ears were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Kindergartners meet sled dog Ears as rookie musher Katherine Keith of Kotzebue pays a visit on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Keith, her sled and Ears were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Sixth grader Austin Barker advances his husky dog cutout to Nikolai as part of an I-Did-A-Read program on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Students updated their reading progress in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Kindergartners ask questions as Iditarod rookie musher Katherine Keith of Kotzebue talks about the contents of her sled on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Keith, her sled and dog "Ears" were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley, left, listens as school I-Did-A-Read coordinator Kelly Tirpack speaks on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Rookie musher Katherine Keith, her sled and dog Ears were also at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Paper huskies represent students participating in the I-Did-A-Read program on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Rookie Iditarod musher Katherine Keith, her sled and dog Ears were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley introduces kindergartner Kuhdarion Andersen to sled dog Ears on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Rookie musher Katherine Keith, her sled and Ears were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Kindergartners ask questions as Iditarod rookie musher Katherine Keith of Kotzebue talks about the contents of her sled on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Keith, her sled and dog "Ears" were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley, left, and Kim Fox of ExxonMobil speak as kindergartners flock around rookie musher Katherine Keith of Kotzebue and her dog Ears on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Keith, her sled and Ears were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Fox and Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Paper huskies represent students participating in the I-Did-A-Read program on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Rookie Iditarod musher Katherine Keith, her sled and dog Ears were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Kindergartners meet sled dog Ears as rookie musher Katherine Keith of Kotzebue pays a visit on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Keith, her sled and Ears were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Sixth grader Austin Barker advances his husky dog cutout to Nikolai as part of an I-Did-A-Read program on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Students updated their reading progress in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Kindergartners ask questions as Iditarod rookie musher Katherine Keith of Kotzebue talks about the contents of her sled on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Keith, her sled and dog "Ears" were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley, left, listens as school I-Did-A-Read coordinator Kelly Tirpack speaks on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Rookie musher Katherine Keith, her sled and dog Ears were also at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Paper huskies represent students participating in the I-Did-A-Read program on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Rookie Iditarod musher Katherine Keith, her sled and dog Ears were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley introduces kindergartner Kuhdarion Andersen to sled dog Ears on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Rookie musher Katherine Keith, her sled and Ears were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Kindergartners ask questions as Iditarod rookie musher Katherine Keith of Kotzebue talks about the contents of her sled on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Keith, her sled and dog "Ears" were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley, left, and Kim Fox of ExxonMobil speak as kindergartners flock around rookie musher Katherine Keith of Kotzebue and her dog Ears on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Keith, her sled and Ears were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Fox and Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Paper huskies represent students participating in the I-Did-A-Read program on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Rookie Iditarod musher Katherine Keith, her sled and dog Ears were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Kindergartners meet sled dog Ears as rookie musher Katherine Keith of Kotzebue pays a visit on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Keith, her sled and Ears were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Sixth grader Austin Barker advances his husky dog cutout to Nikolai as part of an I-Did-A-Read program on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Students updated their reading progress in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Kindergartners ask questions as Iditarod rookie musher Katherine Keith of Kotzebue talks about the contents of her sled on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Keith, her sled and dog "Ears" were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley, left, listens as school I-Did-A-Read coordinator Kelly Tirpack speaks on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Rookie musher Katherine Keith, her sled and dog Ears were also at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Paper huskies represent students participating in the I-Did-A-Read program on Tuesday morning, February 25, 2014, at Huffman Elementary School. Rookie Iditarod musher Katherine Keith, her sled and dog Ears were at the school in conjunction with an announcement by Kim Fox of ExxonMobil and Iditarod executive director Stan Hooley that ExxonMobil will financially support the race and the Iditarod Education Program for another five years. "Iditarod is an education inspiration," said Fox, citing "dogs, the spirit of adventure and competition. It's pretty magical." The school, whose mascot is the husky, is in its fifth year of an I-Did-A-Read program, where students earn Iditarod miles for every minute they read between February 18 and March 19. The youngsters are able to advance their paper husky cutouts from bulletin board checkpoint to checkpoint around the building as they read, receiving incentive prizes as they go. Martin Buser will hand out grand prizes later to lucky winners drawn from among those reading their way to Nome. "We did it to get kids excited about reading, and excited about Iditarod," said school coordinator Kelly Tirpack. "It's a happy day!," summarized Hooley.
Erik Hill
Alaska Dispatch