One-use parachutes debut in JBER exercise

For the first time in Alaska, a U.S. Air Force C-130 Hercules delivers pallets of simulated supplies using the Low-Cost, Low-Velocity (LCLV) parachutes for a drop onto Malemute Drop Zone on Friday, May 16, 2014, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson. The LCLV is an alternative delivery method for the paratroopers of the 4th Quartermaster Company, assigned to the 725th Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, and can safely drop a supply pallet weighing up to 2,200 pounds into remote locations such as those found in Afghanistan, or Alaska. The one-time use parachute is made of recycled materials and is used to drop supplies for troops in remote locations or when conventional parachutes are not available Ð they are not used to drop personnel. The parachutes are pre-packaged by the manufacturer and only require military parachute riggers to affix them to supply pallets before being loaded aboard aircraft. Used to date exclusively and extensively in Afghanistan, FridayÕs operation was the first use of the parachute in Alaska.
Sgt. Eric-James Estrada
For the first time in Alaska, a U.S. Air Force C-130 Hercules delivers pallets of simulated supplies using the Low-Cost, Low-Velocity (LCLV) parachutes for a drop onto Malemute Drop Zone on Friday, May 16, 2014 at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson. The LCLV is an alternative delivery method for the Paratroopers of the 4th Quartermaster Company, assigned to the 725th Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, and can safely drop a supply pallet weighing up to 2,200 pounds into remote locations such as those found in Afghanistan, or Alaska. The one-time use parachute is made of recycled materials and is used to drop supplies for troops in remote locations or when conventional parachutes are not available Ð they are not used to drop personnel. The parachutes are pre-packaged by the manufacturer and only require military parachute riggers to affix them to supply pallets before being loaded aboard aircraft. Used to date exclusively and extensively in Afghanistan, FridayÕs operation was the first use of the parachute in Alaska.
Sgt. Eric-James Estrada
U.S. Army paratroopers with the 4th Quartermaster Detachment, 725th Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division unload a container of Low-Cost Low-Velocity (LCLV) parachutes at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska May 7, 2014. The LCLV parachutes are so named because they are used for cargo airdrops made below 1,200 feet, with cargo aircraft flying at low speed as parachute-rigged containers roll off the rear ramp.
Sgt. Eric-James Estrada
U.S. Army Paratroopers with the 4th Quartermaster Detachment, 725th Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division place a Low-Cost Low-Velocity (LCLV) parachute atop palletized equipment at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska May 7, 2014. The LCLV parachutes are so named because they are used for cargo airdrops made below 1,200 feet, with the cargo aircraft flying at low speed as parachute-rigged containers roll out the rear ramp. The parachute is made of recycled materials and is used to drop supplies for troops in remote locations or when conventional parachutes are not available Ð they are not used to drop personnel. The parachutes are pre-packaged by the manufacturer and only require military parachute riggers to affix them to supply pallets before being loaded aboard aircraft. The parachute system can safely drop a supply pallet weighing up to 2,200 pounds. Used to date exclusively and extensively in Afghanistan, FridayÕs operation was the first use of the parachute in Alaska.
Sgt. Eric-James Estrada
U.S. Army Paratroopers with the 4th Quartermaster Detachment, 725th Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division place a Low-Cost Low-Velocity (LCLV) parachute atop palletized equipment at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska May 7, 2014. The LCLV parachutes are so named because they are used for cargo airdrops made below 1,200 feet, with the cargo aircraft flying at low speed as parachute-rigged containers roll out the rear ramp.
Sgt. Eric-James Estrada
A U.S. Army paratrooper with the 4th Quartermaster Detachment, 725th Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division prepares a pallet of simulated ammunition to be dropped using Low-Cost Low-Velocity (LCLV) parachutes at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska May 7, 2014. The LCLV parachutes are so named because they are used for cargo airdrops made below 1,200 feet, with the cargo aircraft flying at low speed as parachute-rigged containers roll out the rear ramp.
Sgt. Eric-James Estrada
U.S. Army Sgt. Paul Von Nahme, right, with the 4th Quartermaster Detachment, 725th Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division explains to other riggers on how to properly place the Low-Cost Low-Velocity (LCLV) parachutes at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska May 7, 2014. The LCLV parachutes are so named because they are used for cargo airdrops made below 1,200 feet, with the cargo aircraft flying at low speed as parachute-rigged containers roll out the rear ramp.
Sgt. Eric-James Estrada
A U.S. Army paratrooper with the 4th Quartermaster Detachment, 725th Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division prepares a pallet of simulated ammunition to be dropped using Low-Cost Low-Velocity (LCLV) parachutes at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska May 7, 2014. The LCLV parachutes are so named because they are used for cargo airdrops made below 1,200 feet, with the cargo aircraft flying at low speed as parachute-rigged containers roll out the rear ramp.
Sgt. Eric-James Estrada
For the first time in Alaska, a U.S. Air Force C-130 Hercules delivers pallets of simulated supplies using Low-Cost, Low-Velocity (LCLV) parachutes during a drop onto Malemute Drop Zone on Friday, May 16, 2014, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson. The LCLV is an alternative delivery method for the paratroopers of the 4th Quartermaster Company, assigned to the 725th Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, and can safely drop a supply pallet weighing up to 2,200 pounds into remote locations such as those found in Afghanistan.
Sgt. Eric-James Estrada
A paratrooper with the 4th Quartermaster Company, assigned to the 725th Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, recovers equipment from a supply pallet that was dropped using the Low-Cost, Low-Velocity (LCLV) parachute delivery system onto Malemute Drop Zone on Friday, May 16, 2014, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson. This is the first time equipment has been dropped into Alaska using this type of delivery system. The LCLV can safely drop a supply pallet weighing up to and including 2,200 pounds into remote locations such as those found in Afghanistan, or Alaska.
Sgt. Eric-James Estrada
Paratroopers with the 4th Quartermaster Company, assigned to the 725th Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, recover equipment from a supply pallet that was dropped using the Low-Cost, Low-Velocity (LCLV) parachute delivery system onto Malemute Drop Zone on Friday, May 16, 2014, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson. This is the first time equipment has been dropped into Alaska using this type of delivery system. The LCLV can safely drop a supply pallet weighing up to 2,200 pounds into remote locations such as those found in Afghanistan.
Sgt. Eric-James Estrada
A paratrooper with the 4th Quartermaster Company, assigned to the 725th Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, recovers equipment from a supply pallet that was dropped using the Low-Cost, Low-Velocity (LCLV) parachute delivery system onto Malemute Drop Zone on Friday, May 16, 2014, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson. This is the first time equipment has been dropped into Alaska using this type of delivery system. The LCLV can safely drop a supply pallet weighing up to 2,200 pounds into remote locations such as those found in Afghanistan.
Sgt. Eric-James Estrada
For the first time in Alaska, a U.S. Air Force C-130 Hercules delivers pallets of simulated supplies using the Low-Cost, Low-Velocity (LCLV) parachutes for a drop onto Malemute Drop Zone on Friday, May 16, 2014, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson. The LCLV is an alternative delivery method for the paratroopers of the 4th Quartermaster Company, assigned to the 725th Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, and can safely drop a supply pallet weighing up to 2,200 pounds into remote locations such as those found in Afghanistan, or Alaska. The one-time use parachute is made of recycled materials and is used to drop supplies for troops in remote locations or when conventional parachutes are not available Ð they are not used to drop personnel. The parachutes are pre-packaged by the manufacturer and only require military parachute riggers to affix them to supply pallets before being loaded aboard aircraft. Used to date exclusively and extensively in Afghanistan, FridayÕs operation was the first use of the parachute in Alaska.
Sgt. Eric-James Estrada
For the first time in Alaska, a U.S. Air Force C-130 Hercules delivers pallets of simulated supplies using the Low-Cost, Low-Velocity (LCLV) parachutes for a drop onto Malemute Drop Zone on Friday, May 16, 2014 at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson. The LCLV is an alternative delivery method for the Paratroopers of the 4th Quartermaster Company, assigned to the 725th Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, and can safely drop a supply pallet weighing up to 2,200 pounds into remote locations such as those found in Afghanistan, or Alaska. The one-time use parachute is made of recycled materials and is used to drop supplies for troops in remote locations or when conventional parachutes are not available Ð they are not used to drop personnel. The parachutes are pre-packaged by the manufacturer and only require military parachute riggers to affix them to supply pallets before being loaded aboard aircraft. Used to date exclusively and extensively in Afghanistan, FridayÕs operation was the first use of the parachute in Alaska.
Sgt. Eric-James Estrada
U.S. Army paratroopers with the 4th Quartermaster Detachment, 725th Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division unload a container of Low-Cost Low-Velocity (LCLV) parachutes at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska May 7, 2014. The LCLV parachutes are so named because they are used for cargo airdrops made below 1,200 feet, with cargo aircraft flying at low speed as parachute-rigged containers roll off the rear ramp.
Sgt. Eric-James Estrada
U.S. Army Paratroopers with the 4th Quartermaster Detachment, 725th Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division place a Low-Cost Low-Velocity (LCLV) parachute atop palletized equipment at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska May 7, 2014. The LCLV parachutes are so named because they are used for cargo airdrops made below 1,200 feet, with the cargo aircraft flying at low speed as parachute-rigged containers roll out the rear ramp. The parachute is made of recycled materials and is used to drop supplies for troops in remote locations or when conventional parachutes are not available Ð they are not used to drop personnel. The parachutes are pre-packaged by the manufacturer and only require military parachute riggers to affix them to supply pallets before being loaded aboard aircraft. The parachute system can safely drop a supply pallet weighing up to 2,200 pounds. Used to date exclusively and extensively in Afghanistan, FridayÕs operation was the first use of the parachute in Alaska.
Sgt. Eric-James Estrada
U.S. Army Paratroopers with the 4th Quartermaster Detachment, 725th Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division place a Low-Cost Low-Velocity (LCLV) parachute atop palletized equipment at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska May 7, 2014. The LCLV parachutes are so named because they are used for cargo airdrops made below 1,200 feet, with the cargo aircraft flying at low speed as parachute-rigged containers roll out the rear ramp.
Sgt. Eric-James Estrada
A U.S. Army paratrooper with the 4th Quartermaster Detachment, 725th Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division prepares a pallet of simulated ammunition to be dropped using Low-Cost Low-Velocity (LCLV) parachutes at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska May 7, 2014. The LCLV parachutes are so named because they are used for cargo airdrops made below 1,200 feet, with the cargo aircraft flying at low speed as parachute-rigged containers roll out the rear ramp.
Sgt. Eric-James Estrada
U.S. Army Sgt. Paul Von Nahme, right, with the 4th Quartermaster Detachment, 725th Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division explains to other riggers on how to properly place the Low-Cost Low-Velocity (LCLV) parachutes at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska May 7, 2014. The LCLV parachutes are so named because they are used for cargo airdrops made below 1,200 feet, with the cargo aircraft flying at low speed as parachute-rigged containers roll out the rear ramp.
Sgt. Eric-James Estrada
A U.S. Army paratrooper with the 4th Quartermaster Detachment, 725th Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division prepares a pallet of simulated ammunition to be dropped using Low-Cost Low-Velocity (LCLV) parachutes at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson, Alaska May 7, 2014. The LCLV parachutes are so named because they are used for cargo airdrops made below 1,200 feet, with the cargo aircraft flying at low speed as parachute-rigged containers roll out the rear ramp.
Sgt. Eric-James Estrada
For the first time in Alaska, a U.S. Air Force C-130 Hercules delivers pallets of simulated supplies using Low-Cost, Low-Velocity (LCLV) parachutes during a drop onto Malemute Drop Zone on Friday, May 16, 2014, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson. The LCLV is an alternative delivery method for the paratroopers of the 4th Quartermaster Company, assigned to the 725th Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, and can safely drop a supply pallet weighing up to 2,200 pounds into remote locations such as those found in Afghanistan.
Sgt. Eric-James Estrada
A paratrooper with the 4th Quartermaster Company, assigned to the 725th Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, recovers equipment from a supply pallet that was dropped using the Low-Cost, Low-Velocity (LCLV) parachute delivery system onto Malemute Drop Zone on Friday, May 16, 2014, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson. This is the first time equipment has been dropped into Alaska using this type of delivery system. The LCLV can safely drop a supply pallet weighing up to and including 2,200 pounds into remote locations such as those found in Afghanistan, or Alaska.
Sgt. Eric-James Estrada
Paratroopers with the 4th Quartermaster Company, assigned to the 725th Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, recover equipment from a supply pallet that was dropped using the Low-Cost, Low-Velocity (LCLV) parachute delivery system onto Malemute Drop Zone on Friday, May 16, 2014, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson. This is the first time equipment has been dropped into Alaska using this type of delivery system. The LCLV can safely drop a supply pallet weighing up to 2,200 pounds into remote locations such as those found in Afghanistan.
Sgt. Eric-James Estrada
A paratrooper with the 4th Quartermaster Company, assigned to the 725th Brigade Support Battalion, 4th Infantry Brigade Combat Team (Airborne), 25th Infantry Division, recovers equipment from a supply pallet that was dropped using the Low-Cost, Low-Velocity (LCLV) parachute delivery system onto Malemute Drop Zone on Friday, May 16, 2014, at Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson. This is the first time equipment has been dropped into Alaska using this type of delivery system. The LCLV can safely drop a supply pallet weighing up to 2,200 pounds into remote locations such as those found in Afghanistan.
Sgt. Eric-James Estrada
Craig Medred