Books

An excerpt from "Find the Good: Unexpected Life Lessons from a Small-town Obituary Writer," the new book by Heather Lende of Haines, chock full of plainspoken good sense.

Heather Lende
Gold's book creates a sense that Wales is truly a place set upon the very edge of the world, where modernity is at best a thin layer beneath which lies a culture that has survived assimilation, financial stress, government policies ranging from imposed westernization to negligence, and the devastation of the 1918-19 flu epidemic.David A. James
Food and what we do with it help define who we are, no matter our culture. In the book’s introduction, Atkan Crystal Stetzof Dushkin says, “Traditional foods are important because traditional foods are one of the last things that we have left to remind us what it means to be Unangax.”Nancy Lord
The author's knowledge of the terrain and climate make the difference. A sea kayaker and backcountry explorer himself, Paul Greci has spent ample time in Prince William Sound. He knows the plant, animal and sea life.David A. James
The author behind the James Abel pseudonym is Bob Reiss, an accomplished New York-based journalist and author who has spent considerable time in the Arctic, including a trip on the icebreaker Healy. In 2012 he published the well-regarded “The Eskimo and the Oil Man."Nancy Lord
Suanne Unger, author of  “Qaqamiigux: Traditional Foods of the Aleutian and Pribilof Islands,” and Moses Dirks, one of the book’s contributors, will take the floor at the next Smithsonian Spotlight lecture, noon Thursday, May 7, at the Anchorage Museum. Mike Dunham
Alaska pilot, author and ecotourism pioneer Mike McBride will sign copies of his book about life on Kachemak Bay at this weekend's Great Alaska Aviation Gathering.Mike Dunham
Saturday, May 2, will be Independent Bookstore Day, and Palmer’s exemplary independent bookstore, Fireside Books, will host Heather Lende from Haines, author of “Find the Good;” “Take Good Care of the Garden and the Dogs” and “If You Lived Here, I’d Know Your Name.” Mike Dunham
If each poem in the latest issue of AQR is partly an answer to the question “What the hell is poetry, anyway?” there are six wildly unique responses from poets with a connection to Alaska. Eva Saulitis
Short looks at "Saloons, Prostitutes and Temperance in Alaska Territory" and "Charlie and the Blanket Toss."Kathleen Macknicki