Features

What is surely the oldest habitable house in Alaska is for sale, a two-and-a-half story wood-frame structure on Campbell Lake built around 1680. To be clear, it hasn’t always been in Alaska. Mike Dunham
Breakup appears to be imminent on the Tanana River at Nenana, perhaps the third-earliest in the history of the Nenana Ice Classic. The ice has never gone out on April 21 or 22.Dermot Cole
An Alaska woman suspected her family's dog snatched her wedding ring, but she couldn't find proof -- until the diamond-encrusted platinum band turned up months later at a local ball field.Associated Press
"It kind of is redneck," auto mechanic Bryan "Bree" Parsons admits of his hard-to-miss "Swiftkick," a Frankenstein's monster of a car made from cobbled-together parts that can be spotted cruising around Anchorage.Suzanna Caldwell
Faced with accelerating memory loss, legendary Anchorage renaissance woman Jean Paal is having her funeral now while she can still enjoy it.Mike Dunham

Avid aurora chaser and photographer Ronn Murray proclaimed March 1 "one of the best nights of aurora this winter," and for good reason. This time-lapse of the northern lights was captured from a hill 45 minutes away from Fairbanks.

Tara Young

Every year at the Fur Rendezvous Hide and Horn auction in Anchorage, the Alaska Department of Fish and Game auctions items confiscated from hunters, recovered from road kills or taken in defense of life and property.

Michelle Theriault Boots
For parents, caring for a newborn can be a draining, trying process. Enter the night nanny -- a caregiver who takes care of the baby's overnight needs, giving parents some much-needed nocturnal respite.Jill Burke
The day before Christmas Eve, the news director of the KSRM Radio Group received a letter in the mail informing her she needed to leave the country. A few days later, the station's news was delivered with an Australian accent for what could have been the last time.Jerzy Shedlock

Bernie Warren started collecting old-school glass electrical insulators, also known as pin insulators, in the 1960s. Almost 50 years later his display of over 2000 items is leaving the state. 

Mike Dunham