Outdoors

A pair of Pacific loons returned to Connors Lake and laid two eggs this year, as has happened nearly every year for more than a decade. 

Alaska Dispatch News
Five-mile trails can deliver spectacular view of Eagle, Symphony lakes -- or a gorgeous unnamed tarn that sits at the bottom of a large secluded amphitheater.Matt Tunseth
The mammoth brown bears were killed over black bear bait stations near Clam Gulch, and they may be among the largest ever taken on the Kenai Peninsula.Beth Bragg
Children are drawn to water, be it through stomping in mud puddles or drawing a canoe paddle across a placid lake. It’s a delightful way to spend time, and Alaska families are fortunate to have a diverse and accessible list of options appropriate for even young kids. Erin Kirkland
The seminar began after the deadly 2012 event raised questions about race safety. Matt Tunseth
Sixteen employees at the McGrath forward-operating base are being laid off July 1. The state defends the budget cuts as necessary, but Alaska forestry director Chris Maisch acknowledges that the situation is “not ideal.” Laurel Andrews
Concerns over continuing effects of the Exxon Valdez oil spill in Prince William Sound inspired biologists from the U.S. Forest Service to monitor black oystercatcher nesting populations. Danielle Rupp | The Cordova Times
The cameras at Brooks Camp drew 16 million viewers last year from every country on the planet except Syria and Yemen, according to Google Analytics. This year, technicians will add a powerful directional microphone at Brooks Falls to pipe natural sounds into people's living rooms. Hannah Colton | Bristol Bay Times

Lake Hood has long been touted as part of the world’s busiest floatplane center. Now it could be the vector for the spread of elodea, a leafy, long-stemmed plant notorious for crowding out native species of freshwater flora.

 

Bob Hallinen
Mixed in with all of the salmon are enough rainbows to make it seem like they are a run of their own. There are numerous pike in side sloughs on the lower river and big grayling lurking under snags along the shorelines. Dolly Varden fin slowly behind the spawning sockeye.John Schandelmeier