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More than 1,000 people jumped into the frigid waters of Goose Lake in Anchorage for a good cause on Saturday, part of this year's Polar Plunge event that organizers expected would raise more than $400,000 for Special Olympics Alaska.

Devin Kelly
The 350-foot-wide avalanche was triggered by the skier and ran downhill an estimated 1,000 feet on the southwest face of Sunburst Ridge. The man's companion, who escaped the avalanche, helped dig him out. Megan Edge
Avalanche dangers and closures at Turnagain Pass have been a cause of frustration for backcountry enthusiasts. The area was still closed to snowmachiners Tuesday, and a recent storm has made skiing and snowboarding more dangerous. Megan Edge
Many prices and fees for overnight camping, annual parking passes and boat launching that have been the same for more than a decade are changing at Alaska State Parks.Megan Edge
It’s time we all take a time out and stop watching the Alaska sky for signs of snow. After all, a watched pot doesn’t boil, therefore a watched forecast doesn’t produce. Look down, instead, at the pages of a good read. Here's some suggestions. Alli Harvey

Last winter, snow conditions were perfect for a line that a group of extreme skiers had been eyeing for years, and professional skier Cody Townsend stepped up and dropped into the ridiculously narrow chasm, plummeting more than 2,000 vertical feet down a tight, cliff-lined chute.

Alaska Dispatch News
The segment earned professional skier Cody Townsend “Line of the Year” award and fueled his “Best Male Performance” nod at the 15th annual Powder Magazine Video Awards earlier this month in Utah.Jason Blevins | The Denver Post
In an advisory issued Sunday morning, the Chugach National Forest Avalanche Information Center said the avalanche danger would be rising to “high” for elevations above 2,500 feet for the first time this season.Devin Kelly
For first-time winter campers, consider someplace a little more accommodating than a tent, so you can gauge how you feel about the experience.Alli Harvey
Alaskans of any political persuasion can agree that we should get to name our own state’s highest mountain, currently misnamed Mount McKinley. And Sen.-elect Sullivan is uniquely positioned to do something about it.Rick Sinnott

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