KAHILTNA GLACIER -- In Anchorage, telltale signs of spring’s arrival include budding willows and returning geese. In Nenana, locals watch for the tilting tripod in the annual Ice Classic.

In Talkeetna, this winter’s end was heralded by the arrival of 25,000-pound U.S. Army Chinook helicopters, which help the National Park Service set up the base camp used by climbers hoping to summit Mount McKinley and other high peaks in the Alaska Range.

The climbing season will begin early next month, and more than 700 mountaineers are already signed up to take a crack at Denali. At about 20,250 feet, the peak is North America’s highest, and it saw 1,200 attempts and 430 summits last year.

The typical launch point for Denali expeditions is the National Park Service’s base camp at 7,200 feet on the Kahiltna Glacier. And on Monday, the Army crews dropped off a last load of gear there after spending nearly a week in the area, ferrying equipment in support of climbing season and using the surrounding high alpine as a playground for training exercises...

KAHILTNA GLACIER -- In Anchorage, telltale signs of spring’s arrival include budding willows and returning geese. In Nenana, locals watch for the tilting tripod in the annual Ice Classic.

In Talkeetna, this winter’s end was heralded by the arrival of 25,000-pound U.S. Army Chinook helicopters, which help the National Park Service set up the base camp used by climbers hoping to summit Mount McKinley and other high peaks in the Alaska Range.

The climbing season will begin early next month, and more than 700 mountaineers are already signed up to take a crack at Denali. At about 20,250 feet, the peak is North America’s highest, and it saw 1,200 attempts and 430 summits last year.

The typical launch point for Denali expeditions is the Park Service’s base camp at 7,200 feet on the Kahiltna Glacier. And on Monday, the Army crews dropped off a last load of gear there after spending nearly a week in the area, ferrying equipment in support of climbing season and using the surrounding high alpine as a playground for training exercises...

Nat Herz

NOME -- The National weather Service plans to realign its Alaska workforce, reducing jobs at several remote offices and shifting positions to the Anchorage and Fairbanks forecast centers. The Nome, Barrow and Kodiak offices currently operate 24-7, but this change would have each office become part time, removing the evening shift and reducing staff.

“You know, this is not a cost-saving measure,” said National Weather Service Alaska Region Director Aimee Devaris. “This is truly our best way to put our resources where they can take the greatest advantage of the science and technology that’s available, because we want to deliver as high a quality service as possible for all of Alaska.”

At a recent meeting in Nome with the city’s emergency planners, Devaris explained that if the change moves forward in Nome, the office will still be open seven days a week, but for 16 hours instead of 24. The evening shift of 4 p.m. to midnight or 5 p.m. to 1 a.m. (depending on daylight savings or standard time) will be cut, so Nome’s office will need just three employees instead of five...

Jenn Ruckel

JUNEAU -- After being unable to finish its business so it could go home, the Alaska Legislature sought Monday to go home anyway after passing budgets it doesn’t have the money to pay for.

By a vote of 26-12 Monday afternoon, the House had enough votes to adopt the budget but not enough to get the money to fund it. Anchorage Democratic Rep. Les Gara decried it as a “phony budget” because it isn’t funded for more than a few months.

That may have Alaska following the federal government in a game of chicken in which each side in the budget battles hopes the other side will get blamed if a crisis emerges over paying for government -- or if state government actually runs out of money and has to shut down.

To balance the state’s budget in a year when oil revenues saw unprecedented declines, Alaska would need to dip into its Constitutional Budget Reserve, but Democrats in the House of Representatives refused to accept the budget written by the Republican majority and provide the votes to reach the three-quarters majority to use the reserve to balance the budget...

Pat Forgey

UAA women have a shot at filling the heptathlon podium after their opening-day performances Monday in the Great Northwest Athletic Conference Multi Championships landed them in the top three spots through four of seven events.

Karolin Anders, a five-time All-American in multi-events, leads the Seawolves trio after racking 3,071 points at St. Martin’s University in Lacey, Washington.

Anders is 228 points ahead of teammate and fellow junior Rosie Smith (2,843 points). UAA senior Haleigh Lloyd is tied for third with 2,777 points.

Meanwhile, UAA junior Travis Turner sits third in the men’s decathlon with 3,328 points through five of 10 events.

The Multi meet wraps Tuesday.

“We’re very happy with Day 1,’’ UAA coach Michael Friess said by cellphone. “Obviously, it’s a two-day meet and we have to continue that momentum.’’...

Doyle Woody

Alaska State Troopers say a 46-year-old man died Sunday near Tanana after he lost control of his ATV and it crashed into a tree.

Lawrence Moses of Tanana was riding on Mission Hill Road, a packed dirt roadway, said Megan Peters, troopers spokeswoman. Moses' ATV left the road about two miles from the Interior village and hit the tree, she said.

A village public safety officer received a report of the wreck around 9:10 p.m. Sunday. The officer and medics responded and found Moses' body. He died from injuries sustained in the crash, Peters said.

Peters said the severity of Moses' injuries suggested he was traveling at high speed. His body was sent to the state Medical Examiner's Office, she said.

Troopers said alcohol also appeared to be a factor in the crash. Peters said it was reported to troopers that Moses had been drinking alcohol earlier Sunday. A toxicology report will determine if intoxication played a role, she said.

Tegan Hanlon

The disk jockey was the outstanding senior boy in 1983 and his father helped build KYUK public radio station. Every couple promenaded down a lighted path lined with dozens of parents, siblings and other community members. Bethel Covenant Church put on a free dinner beforehand and a party afterward.

Bethel Regional High School’s 2015 prom took place Saturday, April 25, 2015, with a nautical theme at Yupiit Piciryarait Cultural Center. Boys ordered tuxes flown in from Anchorage or went to the big city for a suit. Girls shopped online, browsed Bethel’s Arctic Belle Boutique or checked out what people were selling through Facebook. They wore matching boutonnieres and wrist corsages, but there were no limos, no spendy dinners downtown, no spa pampering beforehand. Some girls carried their high heels and wore sneakers through the dirt parking lot. The cost to get in was $40 a couple for those who planned in advance.

Lisa Demer

The saying "the odds are good but the goods are odd" about Alaska bachelors may never have been so true as it is in this 1980s promo for Alaska Men magazine.

Alaska Dispatch News

The budget approved by the Alaska Legislature Monday would drain a $1.3 billion account set aside to provide school districts some measure of financial stability. The plan would end the “forward funding” of kindergarten-though-12th grade public education in Alaska, a system under which lawmakers had set aside money more than a year before it would be needed.

But the overall budget bill, passed by both the House and Senate Monday on the way to adjournment more than a week late, does not resolve a $3.2 billion financial impasse for the 2016 fiscal year that starts in July.

The budget bill would use the education savings account to cover the state shortfall for Fiscal Year 2015, which ends in two months. To pay for government operations in the next fiscal year, legislators will need to withdraw about $3.2 billion from the Constitutional Budget Reserve. While the Senate majority has exactly the three-quarter margin needed to withdraw that cash, the House majority does not. Both ruling caucuses are led by Republicans and contain rural Democrats -- one Bush Democrat in the Senate, four in the House...

Dermot Cole

Aaron Haines and Christene Hemry each earned two titles in the Mayor's Cup tennis tournament, which ended Sunday at The Alaska Club East.

Haines won the men's A singles over finalist Joseph Hemry and combined with Ryan Roys to win the men's A doubles. Christene Hemry took the women's A singles and teamed with Joseph Hemry to capture the mixed A doubles.

Mayor's Cup Tennis Championships

Division winners

Men

A singles -- Champion : Aaron Haines. Finalist : Joseph Hemry. B singles -- Champion : Yuri Maslovsky. C singles -- Champion : Greg Bidwell. 50s singles -- Champion : Peter Lang. A doubles -- Champions : Aaron Haines-Ryan Roys. B doubles -- Champions : Bill Cotton-Jack Lewis. Finalists : Christian Dougherty-Jay Green. C doubles -- Champions : Mike Mense-Igor Ponomarenko. 50s doubles -- Champions : Dave Reeves-Dave LeClair.

Women

A singles -- Champion : Christene Hemry. C singles -- Champion : Michelle Rothoff.

Mixed

A doubles -- Champions : Joseph Hemry-Christene Hemry. 50s doubles -- Champions : Fred Lief-Jessie Lief.

Alaska Dispatch News