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Rural Alaska

Federal managers have agreed to closely monitor Kuskokwim River salmon runs to ensure enough fish for residents who depend on it for subsistence, but at this point don't plan to take over the river, as they did earlier this summer.

Lisa Demer
Village public safety officers will begin training to carry firearms for the first time as early as January, says the statewide coordinator for the rural police force. As the officers prepare for weapons instruction by troopers, regional Alaska Native associations say many questions of liability and public safety remain. Kyle Hopkins
It's been a year since the Pebble Partnership lost two major investors, taking with them numerous jobs in a region that had few to begin with. Now the communities are adjusting to their new reality.Suzanna Caldwell
A dozen residents of a remote Russian village have braved the Bering Strait to visit friends and relatives in Alaska. Gambell residents say the boat voyage is the first such international crossing in 14 years, reviving an ancient exchange program that was interrupted in the past century by world wars, cold wars and deadly seas.Kyle Hopkins
On the Yukon River, fishermen scooped up tens of thousands of salmon in a new commercial dipnet fishery that spares king salmon. On the Kuskokwim, the fish were elusive, and dipnets have not been embraced as a new gear method for subsistence.Lisa Demer
Alaska State Troopers say six fishing vessels were seized after their operators were discovered this month drifting gillnets one to two nautical miles outside an open fishing area in Kulukak Bay in Southwest Alaska.Jerzy Shedlock
Like many Arctic villages, the Brooks Range community of about 300 is in need of housing. At a recent meeting residents, engineers and officials talked about the prospect of building a new subdivision, with new streets and homes.Jillian Rogers
Despite early season salmon restrictions, Yup’ik fish camps bustle with activity as families harvest food for the winter.Lisa Demer
After the death of village public safety officer Thomas Madole, the Alaska Legislature voted unanimously to allow Native associations to let the officers carry handguns. The bill was signed into law Friday in Naknek by Gov. Sean Parnell. Pat Forgey
The king salmon’s disappearance is an ecological mystery as cryptic as it is alarming, and for the villages that dot the banks of the 2,200-mile-long Yukon River, the salmon’s absence hasn’t just eroded fishing culture. It’s strained local health and prosperity.Ben Goldfarb

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