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Ancient bones recovered from an archaeological site in the Gulf of Alaska offer a glimpse into the last time the Earth underwent a drastic change in climate -- and it includes a spike in mercury levels in the world's oceans.

Yereth Rosen
Through the years, UAF researchers have traveled to Barrow for interviews and gathered existing recordings of the few Americans who live with sea ice -- and depend upon it. Ned Rozell
The U.S. Geological Survey has released new maps identifying areas of northern and central Alaska with potential for deposits of rare-earth elements that are becoming commercially valuable because of their use in high-tech products. Yereth Rosen
Glacial rivers move the stuff of life, carbon, and redeposit it to the sea. Glacial melt increases sea level. And Alaska and northern Canada are moving water like a fire hose that grows in diameter each summer.Ned Rozell
Though rare, thundersnow is a real phenomenon, a snow thunderstorm that occurs under circumstances similar to a thunderstorm as a cold or warm front moves into an area. The thunder is often muffled by the snow, but the flashes may still be visible.Carey Restino
Most likely, some 350,000 birds are in the icy waters awaiting breakup. Once snow melts from the tundra to expose nesting sites, the birds will return to northern or southwestern Alaska -- or more likely Siberia.Ned Rozell
Slight rumblings and other volcano-like signals deep beneath Alaska's Denali National Park have captured the attention of volcanologists. Ned Rozell
The small glaciers, hanging on the upper reaches of the mountains in the northeast corner of remote Togiak National Wildlife Refuge, are melting at a rate that would make them disappear entirely by the end of this century, according to a new study.Yereth Rosen
Fairbanks scientist Zebulon Maharrey has spent the last four years looking at the volcano. Augustine last erupted in 2006, sending an ash cloud two miles high and oozing enough lava to create a new summit.Ned Rozell
Alaska Sen. Lisa Murkowski, a Republican, and Maine Sen. Angus King, an independent who is part of the Senate’s Democratic minority, are launching a U.S. Senate Arctic Caucus to raise awareness of the region among their colleagues as the U.S. prepares to chair the Arctic Council.Yereth Rosen