F-22 Raptor crash

Col. Jack McMullen, 3rd Wing commander, announces the death of pilot Capt. Jeff Haney based on evidence at the F-22 Raptor crash site Friday evening November 19, 2010 on Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson in Anchorage, Alaska. Haney's aircraft went down Tuesday evening November 16, 2010 near the eastern boundary of Denali National Park and Preserve.
ERIK HILL / Anchorage Daily News
Captain Jeff Haney. Pilot of the F-22 that crashed near the Susitna Lodge on the Denali Highway Tuesday November 16, 2010.
Photo courtesy of Joint Base Elmendorf - Richardson
Capt. Jeffrey Haney. Jeffrey Haney, an F-22 pilot who was apparently killed when his plane crashed 100 miles north of Anchorage.
Photo provided by Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson
Soldiers from the 6th Engineer Battalion take shelter from the snowy rotor wash after hooking up a cargo sling to a UH-60 Black Hawk during a sling load operation.
Photo courtesy U.S. Army
Base camp at Susitna River Lodge on the Denali Highway served as headquarters for the soldiers and airman from Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson involved with the recovery operations for the crashed F-22 Raptor.
Photo courtesy U.S. Army
F-22 Raptors could be seen in the air over Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson on Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2011, for the first time in four months after being grounded for safety concerns with the oxygen system.
BILL ROTH / Anchorage Daily News
F-22 Raptors could be seen in the air over Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson on Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2011, for the first time in four months after being grounded for safety concerns with the oxygen system.
BILL ROTH / Anchorage Daily News
F-22 Raptors could be seen in the air over Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson on Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2011, for the first time in four months after being grounded for safety concerns with the oxygen system.
BILL ROTH / Anchorage Daily News
F-22 Raptors could be seen in the air over Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson on Wednesday, Sept. 21, 2011, for the first time in four months after being grounded for safety concerns with the oxygen system.
BILL ROTH / Anchorage Daily News
An Army Light Medium Tactical Vehicle (LMTV), a wheeled vehicle with a 2.5 ton cargo capacity capable of transporting personnel and equipment parked at the base camp along the Denali Highway.
Photo courtesy U.S. Army
Craig Medred