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PHOTOS: Alaska's woolly, windswept wild cattle

A bull on Wosnesenski Island. Wosnesenski and Chirikof Islands, southwest of Kodiak Island, have approxomately 1,000 cattle, formerly domesticated, that are now mostly wild, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service is trying to figure out what to do with them.
USFWS / Steve Ebbert
A lone bull stands on eroded dunes on Wosnesenski Island. Wosnesenski and Chirikof Islands, southwest of Kodiak Island, have approxomately 1,000 cattle, formerly domesticated, that are now mostly wild, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service is trying to figure out what to do with them.
USFWS / Steve Ebbert
Sandy dunes resulting from overgrazing on Wosnesenski Island. Wosnesenski and Chirikof Islands, southwest of Kodiak Island, have approxomately 1,000 cattle, formerly domesticated, that are now mostly wild, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service is trying to figure out what to do with them.
USFWS / Steve Ebbert
A bull stands on a former ranch road on Chirikof Island. Wosnesenski and Chirikof Islands, southwest of Kodiak Island, have approxomately 1,000 cattle, formerly domesticated, that are now mostly wild, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service is trying to figure out what to do with them.
USFWS / Steve Ebbert
A lone bull stands on eroded dunes on Wosnesenski Island. Wosnesenski and Chirikof Islands, southwest of Kodiak Island, have approxomately 1,000 cattle, formerly domesticated, that are now mostly wild, and the US Fish and Wildlife Service is trying to figure out what to do with them.
USFWS / Steve Ebbert
Yereth Rosen

Know what to do with 1,000 wild cattle roaming two faraway Alaska islands? If so, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service wants to hear from you. The agency is soliciting proposals for coping with a herd of unattended cattle that have been free to roam on Chirikof and Wosnesenski islands for decades. Both islands, southwest of Kodiak Island and far away from large communities, are part of the Alaska Maritime National Wildlife Refuge; neither island is natural habitat for cattle.

Officials say the cattle are a problem because of the damage they're causing to wildlife habitat and cultural resources. On Thursday, they announced the start a formal environmental-review process to find a solution to the cow conundrum.

READ MORE: Federal managers seek help with feral cattle, home on Alaska's range