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Photos: Harvest time at Pyrah's U-pick farm

From left, Sullivan Cohen, Judy Gette and Quinn Larson peruse brassicas at Pyrah's Pioneer Peak Farm on August 17, 2012. Pyrah's operates Alaska's largest U-pick farm.
Loren Holmes photo
Judy Gette and Sullivan Quinn pick broccoli at Pyrah's Pioneer Peak Farm on August 17, 2012. Pyrah's operates Alaska's largest U-pick farm.
Loren Holmes photo
Quinn Larson, left, and Sullivan Cohen search for the biggest broccoli crowns they can find at Pyrah's Pioneer Peak Farm on August 17, 2012.
Loren Holmes photo
Annie Anderson and her son Beam, 17 months, picking vegetables for a Sunday BBQ at Pyrah's Pioneer Peak Farm. August 17, 2012
Loren Holmes photo
3-year-olds Bodi Anderson, left, and Loden Johnson get distracted from their task of vegetable picking at Pyrah's Pioneer Peak Farm. August 17, 2012
Loren Holmes photo
Bodi Anderson, 3 years old, helps his mom Annie bag lettuce at Pyrah's Pioneer Peak Farm on August 17, 2012.
Loren Holmes photo
3-year-olds Bodi Anderson and Loden Johnson examine the day's harvest from the back of a wagon, pulled by Anne Johnson. The Andersons and Johnsons were picking vegetables for a BBQ at Pyrah's Pioneer Peak Farm on August 17, 2012.
Loren Holmes photo
Pre-picked onions and garlic, for those that don't want to get their hands dirty at Pyrah's Pioneer Peak Farm. August 17, 2012
Loren Holmes photo
Loren Holmes

The Alaska Grown program's slogan may be "fresher by far," but even that can't compare to the fresh vegetables you get when you pick them yourself. Alaska's largest "U-pick" farm is Pyrah's Pioneer Peak Farm, located in Butte, where as of late August most everything is ready to be picked.

Good weather but cold summer temperatures mean many of the vegetables are just now ready for harvest. This past weekend there were potatoes, broccoli, cauliflower, lettuce, onions, garlic, cabbage and kohlrabi. In the coming weeks expect to find cucumbers, zucchini, strawberries and raspberries.

By the time Pyrah's hosts its fall festival, scheduled for Sept. 15 and 22nd, expect everything to be available. The only downside to waiting is that not only might the best produce be picked, but the cold temperatures may threaten to freeze the crops.

The fall harvest festival, now in its third year, has grown exponentially, with last year's festival attracting an estimated 6,000 people. For more information, check out Pyrah's Facebook page. And while you're out at the farm, keep an eye out for migrating geese and cranes.