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Photos: Making lefse, Norwegian potato flatbread

Lefse dough
Kim Sunée
Lefse with butter, sugar and cinnamon
Kim Sunée
Lefse with smoked salmon, creme fraiche and capers
Kim Sunée
Lefse, or Norwegian potato flatbread
Kim Sunée
Kim Sunée

I loved it when my Norwegian great grandmother, Nora, would come and visit us in New Orleans. She had lived in Minnesota most of her adult life but still spoke with a heavy, bouncy accent. She’d send my sister and me off to school with fingers still sticky with her homemade cinnamon rolls and we’d rush back in the afternoon, excited to discover what Nora had baked that day.

She made the lightest yeast rolls, but my favorite was coming home to see the much-used griddle set on the stovetop and already smelling of nutty, melted butter. We would stand, eye level to the counter, and watch with wonder as Nora rolled out fresh potato flatbreads, lefse, that we would devour, hot off the grill, slathered in butter and sugar.

Whether sweet or savory, this humble potato flatbread rises to any occasion. It’s not only a great way to use up leftover potatoes, but also serves as an after-school snack that might just be someone else’s pleasant childhood memory in the making.

Read more: Whether sugared or savory, lefse is a welcome treat