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Photos: Paddling around Alaska's Cook Inlet with 2 young children

Erin McKittrick and Bretwood "Hig" Higman walking into a chilly headwind. The couple, with their two young children Katmai and Lituya, are spending four months walking around Cook Inlet.
Courtesy Ground Truth Trekking
Lituya climbs over a rocky point. She is trekking around Cook Inlet with her brother Katmai and parents Erin McKittrick and Bretwood "Hig" Higman.
Courtesy Ground Truth Trekking
Ice falls graced the cliffs of Dogfish Bay, near the start of their journey.
Courtesy Ground Truth Trekking
A beach made mostly of barnacle and other shell fragments forms on Grass Island in Eldredge Passage.
Courtesy Ground Truth Trekking
A tidepool near Nanwalek, at the start of their journey.
Courtesy Ground Truth Trekking
The kids look out at the ocean on one of our many climbs over headlands between Dogfish Bay and Nanwalek.
Courtesy Ground Truth Trekking
A small sea cave provided protection from the wind for a fire.
Courtesy Ground Truth Trekking
A wintry day on the coast.
Courtesy Ground Truth Trekking
Wind-driven cold snow coats a tide flat on Kachemak Bay.
Courtesy Ground Truth Trekking
Landfall in Homer: A calm evening in Kachemak Bay.
Courtesy Ground Truth Trekking
The sun sets next to Redoubt Volcano.
Courtesy Ground Truth Trekking
Tidal currents carried us up Turnagain arm.
Courtesy Ground Truth Trekking
Filling a water sample on Portage Creek in Turnagain Arm for a carbon study.
Courtesy Ground Truth Trekking
A warm day and Katmai kept dropping layers until he was shirtless, and this inspired trail running.
Courtesy Ground Truth Trekking

The Higmans -- Hig, Erin and the two small children -- paddled into Anchorage last week in their tiny inflatable boats via Turnagain Arm, and they made it alive. This would not be newsworthy except for the fact that so many in the state's largest city consider the Arm so dangerous. 

As a result, Turnagain Arm has become a body of water largely reserved for advocates of extremes sports -- windsurfers, kite boarders, and those kayakers and surfers brave enough to ride the bore tides that sometimes roll a big wave of water east up Turnagain Arm from Cook Inlet.

The Higmans -- Brentwood or Hig as he is usually known, wife Erin McKittrick, 4-year-old Katmai and 2-year-old Lituya -- are none of those things. Hig is a PhD-toting geologist who once studied the Arm's bore tides to see what they might teach us all about how tsunamis work. Erin is, or was, a molecular biologist. They live across Kachemak Bay from Homer. 

And the kids are, well, kids, which makes them among the most adaptable animals on the planet. The Higman kids have lived a life of adventure without really knowing it because in their world, with parents who regularly pull off epic treks, adventure is the norm.

Full story: Paddle adventure around Alaska's Cook Inlet with 2 children in tow