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Photos: Team Arctic Row prepares for 1200-mile odyssey

The Arctic Row team. They are attempting to row from Canada to Russia.
Courtesy Arctic Row
The Arctic Row team loading their boat. They are attempting to row from Canada to Russia.
Courtesy Arctic Row
The Arctic Row team. They are attempting to row from Canada to Russia.
Courtesy Arctic Row
The Arctic Row team. They are attempting to row from Canada to Russia.
Courtesy Arctic Row
The Arctic Row team. They are attempting to row from Canada to Russia.
Courtesy Arctic Row
The Arctic Row team. They are attempting to row from Canada to Russia.
Courtesy Arctic Row
The Arctic Row team. They are attempting to row from Canada to Russia.
Courtesy Arctic Row

They're calling it the Arctic Row. Four men with a profound love of adventure are setting out to do something dangerous and unprecedented -- something they could not have done before the ice covering the top of the world began to melt in earnest.

They are going to row across the Arctic Ocean, nonstop and without support.

It's just four U.S. men in a narrow rowboat -- but they have a gigantic issue before them: what the melting of the Arctic means for the world. Obviously, they won't come away with all the answers. What they say they're looking for, at the very least, is to raise a little more awareness about the changes underway in the Arctic.

Promoters of the voyage have billed it as "one of the world's last great firsts."

The four rowers -- Paul Ridley, Collin West, Neal Mueller and Scott Mortensen -- plan to board their 29-foot-long, 6-foot-wide rowboat on July 15 and spend the next 30 days aboard the craft, taking turns rowing, two at a time, for two-hour shifts, 24 hours a day.

Read more about Arctic Row here.