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Until recently, the Arctic Ocean's central Beaufort Sea was ice-covered throughout the summer. But with a greater expanse of open water, scientists are tracking how waves and well-traveled swells could accelerate the loss of summer ice.Pete Spotts

The Inupiat have a name for walrus with extra tusks, says Mary Sage of Barrow, who shared photos of the spoils of a recent hunt: Tulugiagruaq.

 

Kyle Hopkins
Communities along Alaska's southeast and southwest coasts have economies most vulnerable to ocean acidification, which especially threatens shellfish and the finfish -- such as salmon -- that eat them.Yereth Rosen
The Porcupine Caribou Herd could face difficulty in coming years if a trend of increased wildfires in northern Alaska and Canada continue to threaten the animals' wintertime food source of lichen, according to a new study.Yereth Rosen

A male Steller sea lion pup born at the Alaska SeaLife Center in Seward earlier this month will be invaluable to a research project study on the nutritional needs of female sea lions, the center's president and CEO Tara Riemer said Monday.

Laurel Andrews
Just when seismologists thought the earthquake swarm near Noatak had settled down, a magnitude 4.55 quake shook the region.Jillian Rogers
Alaska's bearded seals, animals with distinctive whiskers and a penchant for floating alone on pieces of drifting Arctic sea ice, were improperly granted threatened-species status in 2012 by the federal government, a judge ruled Friday Yereth Rosen
A well blowout, pipeline breach or vessel accident in the Canadian Beaufort Sea could spew spilled oil westward for months, polluting waters off Alaska and soiling habitat used by whales, seals and migrating seabirds, according to a study released Friday by the World Wildlife Fund.Yereth Rosen

Take a look at the National Research Council report that has determined emerging questions to help researchers understand how changes in the Arctic will affect society and the environment globally.

Alaska Dispatch
With a 103-foot wingspan, the single-engine ER-2 performs like a jet-powered glider, cruising at 60,000 feet to collect data about Arctic sea ice and requiring a pair of pilots -- one in the aircraft, one on the ground -- to execute a landing.Dermot Cole

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