Science

Three-quarters of Alaskans are sold on the existence and seriousness of global warming, but far fewer are convinced that it's caused by human activity, according to a poll commissioned by Alaska Dispatch News. Erica Martinson
A decade's worth of sampling has revealed the presence of algae-related toxins in marine mammals in the Arctic Ocean, a new study finds -- the farthest north these toxins, associated with warmer waters, have ever been found.Yereth Rosen
Astronomers on Thursday announced that their new billion-dollar U.S. observatory has detected a gravitational wave, a phenomenon Albert Einstein predicted a century ago in his theory of general relativity.Seth Borenstein | Associated Press
A new five-year plan to aid recovery of the endangered Cook Inlet beluga population includes further research on underwater noise in the whales' Southcentral Alaska waters, considers noise restrictions in the Susitna River delta and seeks to improve responses to strandings.Yereth Rosen
A senior Russian government official on Tuesday formally presented to the United Nations his country’s claim to Arctic Ocean seabed, including an area under the North Pole.Andrew E. Kramer | The New York Times
Brain responses related to tasks requiring sustained attention peaked around the summer solstice and bottomed out around the winter solstice. For tasks requiring working memory, participants' brain functions peaked around the autumn equinox and bottomed out around the spring equinox.Erin Blakemore
The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will not likely take action to pre-emptively block the massive Pebble Mine proposed in the Bristol Bay watershed, because of delays caused by a series of lawsuits, a top agency official said Monday.Yereth Rosen
Beaufort Sea polar bears equipped in 2014 and 2015 with Fitbit-like devices and neck cameras revealed their daily routines to scientists studying their food needs.Yereth Rosen
When the White House held a summit on earthquake resilience last week, Alaska was conspicuously absent, a sign of the state's struggle to catch up with other earthquake-prone places when it comes to preparedness. Erica Martinson
Stronger winds and thinner ice are forcing Alaska polar bears to work harder to remain in Alaska, according to scientists who have studied increased movements of both sea ice and bears.Ned Rozell
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