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Bush Pilot

Albert Ball passed away earlier this year prior to being recognized as one of the latest members of the Alaska Aviation Legend program, but as an Alaska Bush pilot for decades, he was certainly worthy of the honor.

Before Paul Shanahan had a plane, he used a team of Mackenzie River huskies and a wooden boat to get to and from his homestead at Susitna Station. By the time he was done flying, he had clocked more than 20,000 hours in the air.
Contrary to a recent Washington Post report, flying in Alaska is not as simple as having a modern map loaded on a handheld GPS.
In between delivering babies, Royce Morgan created Polar Airways, which enjoyed great success during the construction of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline.
Bill Diehl's desire to one day fly an airplane began when he was just six years old, and eventually that fascination with aviation led to Diehl designing and manufacturing the Arctic Tern, with dozens of the aircraft produced in Alaska.
Gene Zerkel was born in Indiana and worked a variety of odd jobs before finding his true calling as an aviator -- and eventually, owner of numerous businesses -- in Alaska.
When Walt Audi came to Alaska in 1964 to work on the DEW line, he quickly realized that in the Arctic, only pilots had the ability to come and go as they pleased -- and a life of aviation was born.
Warren Thompson spent years in rural Alaska helping to conduct search and rescue missions and establishing aviation rescue groups. Over that time, he located or helped find 17 people in the Alaska Bush.
Joyce Galleher arrived in Bethel on a 28-below-zero day in 1951, and would spend the next several decades with her husband building up Bush Alaska air carrier Munz Northern Airlines.
All mechanics who tested with Designated Mechanic Examiner Marty James Simmons in Anchorage must retake their oral examinations, per an FAA notice.

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