AD Main Menu

One thing the Interior Alaska village of Huslia, famous for its successful sled dog racers, can’t lay claim to is being a checkpoint for the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race. That's changing this year, and the residents are thrilled. Suzanna Caldwell

One of Alaska's best and most beloved mushers , George Attla, died Sunday at age 81.

Beth Bragg
A commentary challenging Yukon Quest mushers' decision to scratch from the race drew ire from online readers.Suzanna Caldwell
Some communities along the traditional Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race route are mourning the loss of this year's race. But villages along this year's special route are preparing to host the race for the first time in years.Suzanna Caldwell

iditarod board member Paul Gebhardt was among race officials who flew the Iditarod Trail on Tuesday before deciding to move the race start to Fairbanks. After looking down at sections of the Dalzell Gorge covered in glare ice, Gebhardt said, a dog team could not manage it. “You can’t take the danger out of it without snow,” he said.

Marc Lester

Only once in its 42-year history has the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race not started from Southcentral Alaska. Here's what the race looked like in 2003, when it started from Fairbanks. This year, poor snow coverage on rugged stretches of the Iditarod Trail north of the Alaska Range has prompted the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race board of directors to move the restart to Fairbanks again.

Alaska Dispatch News
Poor snow coverage on rugged stretches of the Iditarod Trail north of the Alaska Range has prompted the Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race board of directors to move the restart to Fairbanks for only the second time ever. The ceremonial start will remain in Anchorage. Suzanna Caldwell
With low snow on portions of the trail north of Alaska Range, the Iditarod board of directors will decide Tuesday whether the race restart should be moved to Fairbanks. The ceremonial start would remain in Anchorage, however. Suzanna Caldwell

Jaimee High has had to drop out of the 2015 Iditarod after she and her husband Justin lost their Willow home to a fire in December. 

Alaska Dispatch News
Willow musher Jaimee High hoped to make a second run at the Iditarod next month, a dream that started for the Idaho transplant as a seventh-grader. But High withdrew from the race last week in the wake of a fire that destroyed her home and sewing business in December.  Zaz Hollander