Voices

Changing climate may end traditions

There has been a big amount of berries where I come from for many generations. These past few years, the berries, geese, moose and ducks have been missing because of climate change. Our traditional values are bursting. Our solution is simple. The governor has only one thing to do — decide what we live by. Make sense, make it work, make it right. Climate change won’t stop without us.

— Jimmy Wise III, age 16 Crow Village Sam School Chuathbaluk...

Alaska Dispatch News

The trip from Delta Junction to Anchorage for the Iditarod vet check seemed endless. I forgot the rabies certificates for Zoya's (my wife), dog team and had to run back 70 miles to get them. The Iditarod is particular about having the proper paperwork. The dogs competing must have current rabies, parvo, corona, distemper and bordella vaccinations.

The Wednesday veterinary exam at Iditarod headquarters is mostly a formality. The real veterinary work has been completed over the past few weeks. In addition to vaccinations, every dog running the Iditarod must have a complete worming, a blood-chemistry scan and an electrocardiogram...

John Schandelmeier

Budget cuts are flying fast and furious around Alaska right now, though the jury’s still out on how many of them will actually stick. Some, however, are looking rather like they might happen. And some of those are so incredibly shortsighted, it makes one’s head spin...

Carey Restino

Former Alaska Governor Sarah Palin has joined critics of Secretary of State Hillary Clinton over the use of private email accounts to conduct public business. The rest of the United States should try not to be distracted by the gales of unseasonably warm laughter coming from Alaska today.

On March 5, Palin's Facebook page posted the following:...

Scott Woodham

The oil and gas industry is the economic engine of Alaska. When exploration leads to production, all Alaskans benefit, regardless of where they live in the state. All of us share in the success that comes with developing Alaska’s resources. Which is why it is so important that we are actively involved in the decisions that are being made by the federal government that will impact our future for decades to come...

Jeremy Price

Litigation headed to the Alaska Supreme Court holds the potential to inflict the largest budget cut in state history on public schools around the state. With that alarm sounded, let me clarify that if everyone keeps calm and starts talking, Alaska can avoid the worst impacts from Ketchikan Gateway Borough vs. State of Alaska...

Andi Story

Elections, normally thought to be straightforward affairs, often turn into rather complicated exercises in civic responsibility. In the general election in Alaska in November 1982, for example, voters went to the polls to choose among four gubernatorial candidates and eight ballot propositions. Bill Sheffield, Tom Fink, Dick Randolph, and Joe Vogler ran respectively as Democrat, Republican, Libertarian and Alaska Independence Party candidates. Voters on the right split their votes between Fink, 37 percent, Randolph, 15 percent and Vogler, 1.5 percent; Sheffield won election with 46 percent of the total...

Steve Haycox
Nanny state legislators need IQs tested

Ok, how many of you in citizenville are aware that as of January 2015, anyone who hires out as a “handyman” must henceforth be licensed, bonded and insured? That’s right, it is now illegal for some poor laborer to dig someone a ditch or paint their fence without first forking out a few hundred bucks annually for the privilege. In their never-ending crusade to protect every single one of us from every possible misfortune in every conceivable circumstance, our enlightened legislators have once again cooked up a regulation to safeguard us from each other.

Well what’s good for the peon is good for the master, I say...

Alaska Dispatch News

For Alaska and its university, this week marks a milestone born out of grit and determination.

One hundred years ago, President Woodrow Wilson signed the act reserving land for the Alaska Agricultural College and School of Mines, but it wasn’t without opposition.

The week of the actual signing, Alaska’s territorial Legislature and governor stood up for what later became the University of Alaska. They provided a crucial endorsement, via telegram to Alaska Territorial Delegate James Wickersham in Washington, D.C., during an end-of-session debate in the U.S. Congress...

Brian Rogers

Politicians, pundits and everybody else spend a lot of time trying to solve problems. Two sides argue their points, usually ad nauseam, and generally very little change actually happens. We blame this on gridlock and pat ourselves on our backs knowing that if we could unilaterally institute change, things would be better.

Quite often, that is probably the case. Gridlock is frequently the problem of progress. If only we could institute this new idea, we could fix a particular problem. Sometimes however, there is a different culprit...

Mike Dingman

Pages