AD Main Menu

Voices

On Nov. 8, 1955, Bob Bartlett addressed the Alaska Constitutional Convention in a speech titled, “Meeting the Challenge.” In asking the delegates to set aside their partisan concerns, he recognized the divergent interests and backgrounds that had assembled for the great task. Bartlett aptly stated: “Here, in this element of compromise, is the very essence of the democratic process.”

Gov. Wally Hickel later reflected, “During the early days of Alaska, it wasn’t them and us. It was all of us.”...

Bill Walker

Well, ladies and gentlemen, we finally have a real governor’s race. On Monday, Alaska Democratic Party leaders voted 89-2 to support an independent ticket made of Bill Walker and Byron Mallott. While Walker was a registered Republican, the Alaska Democratic Party is in such disarray that they have now put their hopes on electing a Republican governor.

Alaska Dispatch News Columnist Shannyn Moore likened waiting for their decision to “Alaska’s version of watching for white smoke out of a chimney.” After the vote was announced she tweeted, “Habemus Papam,” the Latin phrase for announcing the choosing of a new pope – quite an interesting interpretation of the Democrats' abandoning their ticket and supporting a pro-life and anti-gay-marriage Republican candidate...

Mike Dingman

Most of you have heard about the Russian prohibition on the importation of seafood products from the United States, the EU, Canada and others. This is a big deal, with a lot of unknown consequences, and will have a significant impact on the U.S. seafood industry. A lot of salmon roe from Alaska goes (or has gone) to Russia during the past several years. Closure of the market will mean oversupply in the remaining accessible markets, which will mean reductions in the value of our roe products. The impacts are not isolated to Alaska: Currently, 1,000 metric tons of West Coast hake (a type of white fish), previously destined to Russia, are sitting in cold storage with prices falling...

Larry Cotter

I was thinking about Labor Day and that got me to thinking about labor, which segued off to a woman in labor, which brings me to my current topic – women having babies to replace the babies taken away by the state or tribe because they are not capable of providing a child with basic safety, nourishment and support...

Elise Patkotak

PAXSON -- It is easy to become entrenched in our thinking. Alaska is an enormous place. We have colossal mountains and big rivers. The tundra and forests seem endless. Alaskans think nothing of a weekend 500-mile round trip to Chitna to dipnet a couple dozen salmon. Think big or stay home.

We have a mammoth oil pipeline. We are deliberating the feasibility of a huge gas project. And we are considering building one of the largest hydroelectric projects in the world. Does the Susitna Dam make sense, though? Maybe we should contemplate more small projects...

John Schandelmeier
On Common Core standards, without interruption

To the man behind me in line at Freddy’s,

When you asked me if I was a teacher and then asked me what I thought about the Common Core standards, I actually believed that you wanted to have a conversation. Instead you interrupted, talked over me, and accused me of being a communist. I stand by my statement that although you seem to have read quite a lot about CCS, it was clear to me that you had only informed yourself about one side of the argument. I’d like to take this opportunity to answer your question without interruption...

Alaska Dispatch News

Career and technical education is a vital part of the work force development effort to train a qualified work force to meet the demands of business and industry. As an administrator of a public career and technical school for the past 16 years and a military veteran with 23 years of service, I can attest to the fact that public and private providers of career and technical education programs share the same goal: to prepare their students to work in a chosen vocation by providing them with the knowledge, skills and abilities identified by business and industry to obtain employment and thrive in the work force...

Dick Harrell

It used to be that you could support a family on a minimum wage salary. Today, a minimum wage worker has to make a choice every day: Buy a gallon of milk for the kids, or buy a gallon of gas to get to work.

The current national minimum wage, frozen at $7.25 per hour since 2009, simply hasn’t kept up with inflation. As a matter of fact, its purchasing power has declined by one-third since the 1960s, and it’s worth less today than it was in 1981. Bus fare has certainly gone up since 1981. Same with the price of a dozen eggs, or a week of child care. Landlords aren’t sending out rent decreases. And yet the value of the minimum wage is eroding...

Thomas E. Perez

There’s a game most of us play. It’s called “What Could Go Wrong?” You know, like, "I’m going to hand my 9-year-old an automatic weapon -- What Could Go Wrong?" Or, "Why not go bare-headed and drive a motorcycle really fast? What Could Go Wrong?" Then there is the always present, "Why don’t we build a giant mine at the headwaters of the largest sockeye salmon fishing run in the entire world? What Could Go Wrong?"

Many Alaskans have asked this question regarding the Pebble mine over the last decade. When the state government seemed to answer “nothing could go wrong,” tribes, fishermen and many others invited the Environmental Protection Agency to study and report...

Shannyn Moore

Whenever a child comes over for an afternoon of play these days, mothers not only have to ask about drop-off times and locations but also the question, “Does your child have any allergies I should know about.”

Allergies, especially among children, have become so widespread nowadays that coffee shops have to carry several types of milk, and many stores are offering gluten-free products to stave off the hungry eyes of those who avoid wheat at all costs...

Carey Restino

Pages