Voices

Like many Alaskans, I often find myself nodding politely as people from other places describe why they love their home. As they talk, my mind wanders off and I picture a sunny flight over the Chugach range, an after-work hike with friends or a bright green aurora in the winter sky. No place compares to Alaska.

So it’s as surprising to me as anyone that I love Nevada. Nevada, of all places!...

Alli Harvey
Stop the DST madness

If the ill-conceived elimination of the daylight saving time bill is enacted, for half the year we will then be two hours behind Seattle, San Francisco and the rest of the West Coast. We will be five hours behind the East Coast just like the bad old days before the time zone changes we wisely went through in the ’80s.

The other half of the year we will be answering the question of anyone we speak to in the rest of the country, “What time is it there?” My brother lives in Arizona, another DST maverick state, so I suppose I should be grateful. I’m not. Gov. Walker, “stop the madness.” I don’t know if it will do any good, but could you at least veto this nonsense...

Alaska Dispatch News

In Gov. Bill Walker’s State of the State address last month, he announced that a Cabinet position has been established to address Arctic issues. He appointed Craig Fleener, previously a permanent member of the Arctic Council, to this post. Walker stated that "Craig will be a vigorous advocate for Alaska's interests as the council addresses Arctic transportation and navigation, tribal issues, climate change, telecommunications and public/private partnerships for Arctic development."

I am encouraged that Walker has established this position and hope that a citizen's council can also be created. I believe this will get more people involved and help get more constructive and relevant information to those who can change the law...

Halbe Brown

Finally, we are on the precipice of one of the biggest projects since the trans-Alaska pipeline that will create thousands of jobs and give the biggest fiscal boost to our state in a generation.

I’m happy to announce this project will create at least 4,000 permanent jobs all around the state. And by 2020, each $1 million we spend will generate $28 million more in the economy. The rate of return on investment is better than anything we could hope to earn on the stock market. This project is responsible and will not damage the environment. No permitting will be required. This project will diversify Alaska’s economy and reduce our dependence on oil and gas to fuel our economy. And we can get started right now...

Vince Beltrami
Medicaid funds would help citizens stuck in the middle

The Republican majority in Juneau recently voted to refuse federal money, our tax dollars, that the federal government wanted to give back to us to expand Medicaid coverage to an additional 40,000 poor and uninsured Alaskans. The political stunt of refusing this money will cost the State of Alaska about 6.6 million dollars. Aren’t we supposed to be trying to save money?...

Alaska Dispatch News

I took a solemn oath to defend and uphold the constitutions of the United States and Alaska. My responsibility is to those sacred documents and to the people of Alaska, particularly all of you, my constituents in Eagle River. Those bonds are stronger than any I shared with the House Majority Caucus here in Juneau. If there is ever a conflict between my oath to the constitutions and promises I made to my constituents versus the caucus here in Juneau, I will choose my oath to the constitutions and my promises to the people...

Rep. Lora Reinbold

In the coming months, the Alaska Department of Natural Resources must decide whether to reserve water in the Middle Fork of the Chuitna River to protect wild salmon, or allow the water, and wild salmon, to be removed by a coal company to extract coal for export to Asia.

The Chuitna River watershed lies 45 miles west of Anchorage, and it supports all five species of wild Pacific salmon. To protect this renewable resource, a group of local Alaskans filed an application to keep enough water in the stream for wild salmon to spawn, rear and migrate...

Frank Rue

Would you like to get a little smarter and a bit more well-to-do? There is a way, and you can work on that right here in Alaska. AARP Driver Safety offers classes regularly from Fairbanks to Southeast.

Driver Safety is a state and nationally accredited course whereby drivers can be rewarded for updating their knowledge and skills. The course has been developed and revised regularly during the past quarter-century, with the most recent, research-based update completed a year ago. Millions of drivers have become safer on the road by investing a bit of time and energy in this program...

Don McDermott

When I was 12 years old, friends and I went exploring the woods around Campbell Airstrip Road, now Bicentennial Park. The foothills of the Chugach Range rose above us toward Near Point, and Wolverine, Knoya and Tikishla peaks. My best friend Dirk asked his dad to drive us in. Andy drove a red 1947 International pickup, with a "three-on-the-tree" manual transmission and a suicide knob on the steering wheel. Some of us rode in the bed of the truck, and two of us teetered on the running boards.

Andy's smoldering Roi-Tan cigar filled the truck's cab with blue smoke as he steered between the ditches. He might have been having as much fun as we were...

Scott Banks
Eliminating DST would be a negative for TV viewers

Eliminating daylight saving time would make a lot of television viewers unhappy. Alaskans currently watch network evening news and prime time at the same time as the Wst Coast. West Coast prime time starts at 8 p.m. In Alaska, we air it live at 7 p.m. This allows Alaskans to participate in contests, vote on talent shows, and engage in social media related to the programming. That would go away when KTUU is forced to delay programming if daylight saving is eliminated...

Alaska Dispatch News