Voices

NEWHALEN -- The first time I fished the Branch was late in the summer of 1974. Cal Martin, his son Danny, and I teamed up that summer to commercial fish for pink salmon near Graveyard Point in the Kvichak district on Bristol Bay. When the season was over, Cal wanted his setnet skiff taken to Newhalen, on the north shore of Lake Illiamna.

The distance from Graveyard Point to Newhalen is approximately 150 miles, and it is home to some of the best rainbow trout fishing in Alaska -- perhaps the world. The Kvichak River, near its outlet on Illiamna at Igiugig, is known for huge rainbow trout...

John Schandelmeier

Here’s what I don’t understand. I don’t understand why we always seem so surprised at the health care needs of veterans returning from wars. It’s not as though this is something new. Every war supplies us with heartbreaking pictures of veterans living in cardboard boxes on streets; of veterans pushing their legless bodies on wooden boards with wheels begging money; veterans reliving the nightmare of what they saw and what they endured to keep their homeland safe...

Elise Patkotak
Thanks for real journalism

Once again, thank you ADN for great investigative reporting and making us aware of another egregious legislative failure/cover-up. You continue to do all Alaskans a great service by making public that which our Legislature hopes to conceal.

One terrible irony I find in this June 22 ADN is Grundmann remaining eligible to receive $1,000 in monthly health benefits coincident with the story of over 5,000 Alaskans losing their health benefits as insurance companies exit Alaska.

As Mr. Whitekeys would (or will?) say, “You can’t make this stuff up!”

— Thomas Petersen Anchorage

Park is a precious jewel

I believe Point Woronzof should stay a park and be available to Alaskans and visitors, at all times...

Alaska Dispatch News

I grew up in what is now been called the most diverse neighborhood in the United States.

It has been a long time since I spent my days running through Mountain View streets and alleyways. However, I would argue it was a pretty diverse community in those days as well...

Mike Dingman

The state of Alaska is giving away our renewable resources at the loss of every resident of Alaska. We are failing to acknowledge the value we have in our wild game populations and the number of nonresident and alien national guests that purchase our Alaska hunting tags. Last year, according to the Alaska Department of Fish and Game website, we sold over 14,000 nonresident hunting tags. With our state in limbo as to which statewide programs to cut and how to raise revenue to pay for these services, I suggest raising nonresident hunting tags more than ten-fold, from a paltry $85 to $1,000. This act alone would give our state $14 million in revenue....

P.J. Simon
State pays Miller Energy, gets nothing

Was anybody else as flabbergasted as I was when I read in the article “Cook Inlet gas producer faces fine and possible SEC lawsuit” (ADN May 7) concerning Miller Energy Resources? It stated, “(Miller Energy) has benefited from the heavy use of Alaska tax credits, with the state funding from 35 percent to 65 percent of its drilling and completion costs per well regardless of success, the company said.” The company expects to collect more than $70 million in payments from the state in 2015...

Alaska Dispatch News

The pope's encyclical on climate change, and the linkage between climate change and poverty, was released on June 18. What the pope has to say about these issues, and the moral imperative for dealing with them, will speak to many. Many leaders of other faiths have also spoken up about the need to deal with climate change as stewards of the earth. The pope emphasizes that the poor and vulnerable are most at risk from climate change, and need to be protected. We don’t need to be religious to understand all this as a moral imperative and a necessity for our own longer-term survival...

Phil Somervell,Curt Karns

We think of fire in black spruce as an unwanted intruder spreading noxious smoke and destruction, but we’d be better off treating fire as a natural part of the landscape in most of Alaska.

This is of little consolation to those who have lost their homes or had their lives disrupted, but fires every 50 to 150 years are no accident, regardless of how they are ignited. Fires are like mosquitoes on the tundra or ice-jam floods on the Yukon. They can’t be stopped...

Dermot Cole

When the Anchorage airport was established in the 1950s, most of Point Woronzof was forested and used year-round for recreation. The Anchorage General Plan adopted in 1961 designated the entire area unoccupied by the airport as “Metropolitan Park.” In 1970, a joint city-borough initiative called Breakthrough Anchorage urged the dedication of the “Point Woronzof Recreation Area.” Even after the airport’s north-south runway was built in the late 1970s, the west side of Point Woronzof was designated Parks and Open Space in the municipality’s comprehensive development plans. Since the 1980s, the area has hosted one of the most wooded and scenic stretches of the Coastal Trail...

Jim Reeves,Dirk Sisson
Rebuilding trust in the Guard

I and most Alaskans applaud Brig. Gen. Laurie Hummel and Gov. Walker in their aggressive and yet thoughtful approaches to rooting out the ailments which plagued the Alaska National Guard over the past years. The recently released report by retired Juneau Superior Court Judge Patricia Collins brought the totality of the malaise within the Alaska Guard command structure into clear focus. Now Hummel and her staff appear to be working as a focused team to correct the past mistakes and failings. As a Vietnam combat veteran, I know the absolute necessity for a strong and trustworthy chain of command in the military. I wish them all well and hope for a complete revitalization of this very important part of Alaska’s civil society...

Alaska Dispatch News