Voices

We now have a national Arctic strategy document issued by the White House. Of course, it doesn’t say everything Alaskans had hoped for. But it is a big step, all very constructive, and an invitation to us to “put meat on the bones."

As a resident of this great state, the potential of this subject strikes me as so important that we should focus on it while taking our minds off the narrower subject of our oil and gas economic lifeline. I believe Arctic development IS the future of this state, much as it surely will encompass oil-and-gas development for some decades...

Alice Rogoff

On behalf of my fellow Bristol Bay fishermen, past and present, I would like to issue a friendly challenge to the Pebble Limited Partnership, and specifically its Chief Executive Officer, John Shively. But first, let’s review a few things that we know about the Bristol Bay watershed and the proposed Pebble Mine:

•The salmon runs of Bristol Bay have sustained residents of this region for approximately 9,000 years, or about 350 generations.

•The proposed mine will sit atop a seismically active saddle that separates two of the most productive salmon-spawning drainages on Earth, Alaska’s Nushagak and Kvichak river systems...

Scott Coughlin

Are rogue bears evil? But more than that, are unpredictability and randomness themselves evil? Let's say they are. Wouldn't that mean our lives are constantly immersed in and threatened by evil? Random events — or perhaps better put, events perceived as random — happen around us all the time, wherever we happen to be. For example: unless I’ve planned to meet someone, anyone I meet at a cafe, say, or a concert, is randomly encountered. Such encounters then become dangerous situations with evil beings, if unpredictable acts and random events are by definition evil. And what about “random acts of kindness”? Those clearly would be impossible...

Bill Sherwonit

Like clockwork, there’s something voters have come to count on with each election: more and more anonymous advertisements sponsored by mysterious, innocuous-sounding groups, voicing support or opposition for a candidate. These groups are taking advantage of loopholes and lax enforcement and leaving voters to wonder who these people are, where the money came from and about their true agendas. Voters can’t be detectives — they want to know who is behind political ads and what their hidden agenda may be before they vote...

Lisa Murkowski,Ron Wyden

I was the happiest kid in the world once. Great parents, the best little brothers, good grades. I was in advanced reading and loved to read.

I grew up in a small village of about 500 people in Alaska's Far North. Everyone knew everyone. I was free to roam and play as I pleased. I had an older sister who I thought the world of. I had an uncle who was awesome; he would take me to the movies, carry me on his shoulders and always had candy or little gifts for me. But our family had a dark side...

Carole Bender

The U.S. Coast Guard announced last week that because of budget constraints and Shell Oil’s recent announcement that it would not be drilling in the Arctic in 2013, the Coast Guard would not resume its Arctic presence this summer. While the exact details are yet unclear, it is likely that the two helicopters and C-130 fixed wing aircraft staged in Barrow last summer, along with communication equipment and increased patrols with Coast Guard vessels, will be pulled out of the area...

Carey Restino

I grew up in a messy house. It’s hard to write those words. But the fact is, I come from a “creative” family, and creativity comes with a lot of stuff.

But lately, as I read various essays debating whether women can really “have it all,” I feel grateful that my mom was a failed housekeeper. I remember her explaining to me that while our family might not have a perfect house, we had the important things – loving relationships and meaningful work. My mom was busy “having it all”: raising two kids and pursuing a successful second career as an artist. She knew what “it all” meant to her.

So this Mother’s Day, I want to thank my mom, Gloria Blasz Logan, for her messy house and the lessons she taught me about being a woman...

Liz Logan

This is what my husband said to my father on the phone: “Not much is new here. The weather is great. The kids are doing fine, and they found a murderer in our neighborhood."

Make that an alleged murderer. Later I heard that the guy they were after may have jumped out a second story window and might have hid in a neighbor’s shed, before he was captured right before a friend and I walked our dogs in nearly the same location. It was a sunny day, my doors were wide open, there were babies and old people at home up and down the road, so I called the police to see what was happening. They said not to worry; a suspect was in custody. When I shared that with another inquiring neighbor, she said, “Suspected of what?”...

Heather Lende

Vaccines are among the most safe and effective public health interventions to prevent serious disease and death.

Before polio vaccine was available, 13,000 to 20,000 cases of paralytic polio were reported each year in the United States.

Before measles immunization was available, nearly everyone in the U.S. got measles, and an average of 450 measles-associated deaths were reported each year between 1953 and 1963.

Before pertussis immunizations were available, nearly all children developed whooping cough. In the U.S., prior to pertussis immunization, between 150,000 and 260,000 cases of pertussis were reported each year, with up to 9,000 pertussis-related deaths.

How do vaccines work?...

Joe McLaughlin

The traditional approach to solving Africa’s problems has been to rely on charity and aid – free money, more or less. And while charity has done much good for millions across the continent in terms of food security, health care, emergency response, and education, its chief weakness is that its results have not proven sustainable...

Tony O. Elumelu