Voices

Anchorage mayoral candidate Dan Coffey has a problem -- a big problem. I'm not sure if it's a medical issue that has affected his memory of events over the last decade or so, or if it's just way easier for him to pretend some of the things he's done or said didn't happen. Shall we climb into the not-so-way-back machine? Oh, it was an exciting time, and I was in the middle of it. We're only going back to 2008 -- for now. There was this wonderful character named Alan Tesche. He was an assemblyman and used to get on the radio for something called The Tesche Report. There was no love lost between Tesche and fellow assemblymen Dan Coffey and Bill Starr. That's a really kind way to say they couldn't stand each other...

Shannyn Moore

Last year, as I traveled throughout our great state, I heard repeatedly how worried Alaskans were about national security. From the growth and brutality of the Islamic State group, to a resurgent Russia waging war in the heart of Europe, to a steady march by Iran to obtain nuclear weapons, Alaskans recognized the unprecedented set of challenges threatening our country.

They sensed what former U.S. Secretary of State Henry Kissinger put into words during a recent U.S. Senate Armed Services Committee hearing: “The United States has not faced a more diverse and complex array of crises since the end of the Second World War.”...

Sen. Dan Sullivan

When I was a kid in Florida, my dad let me use his car for the evening. It was an MGA, a wire-wheeled wonder I dreamed of getting upon graduation. He warned me not to take it to Daytona Beach that night -- or else. "You understand?" he asked. No beach. Or else.

Ah, Daytona at night. Heaven. Testosterone and steamy possibilities. Irresistible. It was only a quick 45 miles thataway, and my friends were going, and, hey, how would the old man ever know? Over and back, I says to myself. Who’s the wiser? So, I did what any kid would do; I disconnected the odometer cable and headed northeast at warp speed, running lights-out in the moonlight to dodge cops on unopened sections of Interstate 4. There may have been alcohol involved...

Paul Jenkins

Recently, two young men from Southcentral Alaska were sentenced in a case that has drawn attention even beyond Alaska’s borders. The Resetarits brothers were originally charged with sexual assault after a 17-year-old boy was assaulted while passed out on a couch at a high school party. At the court hearing, Anthony Resetarits, the older of the two brothers, who was 20 at the time, told the judge how the crowd of drunk high school students wrote on this young man with Sharpies, how someone shaved his head with clippers, and how someone in the crowd eventually pulled the young man’s pants down and placed an object between his legs, all in plain view of more than 50 partygoers....

Carey Restino
What would Jesus do with the budget?

Rep. Rob Woodall, R-Ga., said, “A budget is a moral document; it talks about where your values are.” They plan to take away $1 trillion from welfare, food stamps and the Affordable Care Act and give $40 billion more for military spending. That’s their moral values. They might as well just shoot the sick and the poor. I suspect the Republicans would respond, “Of course, it’s a moral budget.” And that’s where we worship different Gods. Mine isn’t money. My God tells me we’re here on Earth to help each other. WWJD? — Lela Ryterski Homer...

Alaska Dispatch News

In 2006 Alaskans “took a stand” against the political establishment and elected the largely untested and inexperienced Sarah Palin as governor.

To the delight of Alaska Democrats, Palin’s agenda began with targeting Republicans, winning her the adoration of the Alaska press who assisted her in soaring to a 70 percent approval rating and beyond. That caught the attention of D.C. power brokers and in the blink of an eye, Palin was a 2008 vice presidential candidate.

Suddenly, the very same Democrats who had fawned over Sarah became her mortal enemies. Palin spent the rest of her governorship under vicious attack and was out of office by July 2009...

Frank McQueary

Uber arrived in Anchorage to a tremendous reception from riders and drivers alike. We heard from folks thrilled by the possibility of being able to request a safe, reliable ride at the tap of a smartphone, and we partnered with nearly 100 eager entrepreneurs who jumped at the opportunity to start and grow their own small business. People are at the core of what we do. Anchorage citizens like Samuel, a legally blind, hardworking Anchorage resident who leaned on Uber to solve the logistical problems associated with not being able to drive -- and Victor, a driver who works three jobs and uses the Uber platform to supplement his income -- inspire our commitment to operating here in Anchorage....

Bryce Bennett

“Racial Thursdays” have touched a nerve nationwide. After Alaska Dispatch News reported that a platoon on Fort Wainwright is being investigated for a tradition of having no conduct rules on racial slurs or discriminatory statements on Thursdays, the story went viral. It is unfortunate at a time in our community when we need to seriously, respectfully, and productively talk about race and culture, that this screaming headline comes out...

Chris Cavanaugh

This week, I introduced legislation to provide health care to more Alaskans using less state money. My bill calls for using all available federal resources and reforming the state’s Medicaid program to improve the lives of Alaskans.

One of the perks of my job as governor is health insurance. For those of us who have insurance, it’s easy to forget what it’s like for the thousands of Alaskans who do not.

They are one mishap away from financial ruin. Medical debt is now the top cause of personal bankruptcy filings in the U.S. No one should have to choose between life-saving care and losing their home...

Gov. Bill Walker

As soon as the luggage was stowed in the plane’s forward belly compartment, the DC-3 made for the runway and lifted off into Quebec’s autumn sky. The date was Sept. 9, 1949. Flying from Montreal, the flight had stopped in Quebec City to pick up additional travelers before continuing on to Baie-Comeau, farther down the St. Lawrence River. Among the passengers who boarded at Quebec were three American businessmen, and the promiscuous wife of a philandering jewelry salesman. Half an hour into the resumed flight, the plane exploded without warning. All 19 passengers and the four crew were killed...

Steve Haycox