According to University of Alaska Fairbanks Geophysical Institute, the aurora borealis is out. Although the Midnight Sun is not quite gone, it's dipping on the horizon, giving northern parts of Alaska a chance to witness the brilliance of the northern lights.

The Facebook page of the Fairbanks-and-North Pole-based group Aurora Borealis Notifications described a "large auroral band" visible from Interior towns around 1:30 a.m. Monday morning. Several photos posted on its page confirmed the sighting.

An image of wispy, green-blue translucent smears against an azure sky near a bright dot of sun is a stark contrast to the lights Alaskans are more familiar with -- deep greens and reds that stand out in winter's peak darkness.

If you're in Alaska and the skies are clear, keep your eyes peeled later this week. According to UAF's forecast for Wednesday and Thursday:

Auroral activity will be low. Weather permitting, low-level displays will be visible overhead from Barrow to Fairbanks and visible low on the northern horizon from as far south as Anchorage and Juneau.

To see pictures from last night's sighting, visit the Aurora Borealis Notification page here and get the latest forecasts from UAF's Geophysical institute, here.